Servizi per la didattica
PORTALE DELLA DIDATTICA

Atelier: the architectural sustainable design E

01QXOQN

A.A. 2018/19

Lingua dell'insegnamento

Italiano

Corsi di studio

Organizzazione dell'insegnamento
Didattica Ore
Lezioni 42
Esercitazioni in aula 18
Tutoraggio 70
Docenti
Docente Qualifica Settore h.Lez h.Es h.Lab h.Tut Anni incarico
Rossi Claudio
Atelier: the architectural sustainable design E (Architectural and urban design)  
    42 18 0 0 1
Micono Carlo
Atelier: the architectural sustainable design E (Building physics)
    18 12 0 0 4
Grosso Mario
Atelier: the architectural sustainable design E (Environmental Technological Design)
    42 18 0 0 3
Collaboratori
Espandi

Didattica
SSD CFU Attivita' formative Ambiti disciplinari
2018/19
The Workshop of the first year deals with the overall theme of urban projects, with specific attention to the impact of sustainability on the construction of the urban form and the relationship with the specific qualities of the urban site. The concept of sustainability is considered here in its broadest meaning, now accepted by the scientific community, which includes - besides the evaluations related to indicators and quantitative parameters - wider considerations, related to the cultural and social implications of the project. This term does not only refer to the building scale, but also to the urban layout level, thus launching a process that can represent a further opportunity to go more in depth to perfect conclusion of the Workshop of the second year. In order to address the issue of sustainability, from the building level to the urban scale, the Workshop of the year takes as its study and project area a territorial situation with a real vocation to transformation. The dimensional and morphological characteristics of the area should allow establishing a system of articulated buildings, and hosting complex urban functions, public spaces, meeting venues and mobility.
The Workshop of the first year deals with the overall theme of urban projects, with specific attention to the impact of sustainability on the construction of the urban form and the relationship with the specific qualities of the urban site. The concept of sustainability is considered here in its broadest meaning, now accepted by the scientific community, which includes - besides the evaluations related to indicators and quantitative parameters - wider considerations, related to the cultural and social implications of the project. This term does not only refer to the building scale, but also to the urban layout level, thus launching a process that can represent a further opportunity to go more in depth to perfect conclusion of the Workshop of the second year. In order to address the issue of sustainability, from the building level to the urban scale, the Workshop of the year takes as its study and project area a territorial situation with a real vocation to transformation. The dimensional and morphological characteristics of the area should allow establishing a system of articulated buildings, and hosting complex urban functions, public spaces, meeting venues and mobility.
The workshop aims at conveying useful knowledge aiming at developing: • A cognitive approach to conjugate the historical, cultural, architectural, technological and environmental aspects, with the ability to recognise and interact with the main parameters that characterize the project site. This is done in terms of the relationship between urban morphology and building forms, existing and planned, and as for a proper understanding and use of natural resources and physical environment (climate, light, sound, green system etc.), that characterise the existing environment. • An eco-compatibility assessment of various options of the project and ideal communication modalities for design and technology choices. Skills that students should acquire aim at: • Design of a masterplan for the project site, under the profile of urban quality in general, and, more specifically, of the relationship between the existing urban fabric and newly-designed parts, the interaction between buildings and open spaces, the socio-cultural and environmental sustainability, and inventive urban form that responds to site-specific characteristics; • Design of a building at the project site, by which architecture, as well as the necessary consistency with the content of the master plan, must be the result of a mindful design process relating to aesthetic, functional, structural, and language aspects and specific attention shall be paid to the bio-climatic approach.
The workshop aims at conveying useful knowledge aiming at developing: • A cognitive approach to conjugate the historical, cultural, architectural, technological and environmental aspects, with the ability to recognise and interact with the main parameters that characterize the project site. This is done in terms of the relationship between urban morphology and building forms, existing and planned, and as for a proper understanding and use of natural resources and physical environment (climate, light, sound, green system etc.), that characterise the existing environment. • An eco-compatibility assessment of various options of the project and ideal communication modalities for design and technology choices. Skills that students should acquire aim at: • Design of a masterplan for the project site, under the profile of urban quality in general, and, more specifically, of the relationship between the existing urban fabric and newly-designed parts, the interaction between buildings and open spaces, the socio-cultural and environmental sustainability, and inventive urban form that responds to site-specific characteristics; • Design of a building at the project site, by which architecture, as well as the necessary consistency with the content of the master plan, must be the result of a mindful design process relating to aesthetic, functional, structural, and language aspects and specific attention shall be paid to the bio-climatic approach.
Attendance to the Atelier requires design skills and preliminary knowledge that is usually acquired in a standard architecture bachelor (3y) program. The student must have a clear understanding of urban design issues and architectural design fundamentals (distribution, typology, morphology, composition) and a basic knowledge in urban history and architectural history, especially regarding urban morphology and building typology. He/she must have a clear understanding of building and urban physics principles and a basic knowledge of construction principles and building technologies. The student is therefore required to: • Know about the established techniques of representation and communication within the discipline of architecture; both traditional representation techniques (perceptual maps, design sketches, physical models etc.) and digital representation techniques (virtual modelling and rendering etc.). • Know how to independently organize: o the analysis of morphological characteristics of urban form, using cartographic, historical and perceptive reading techniques; o the reading of technological characteristics of buildings (building components, traditional materials etc.) and the analysis of the main environmental and climate variables at a urban and individual building level; o the project at the urban and building scale (with reference to the typological and distributive aspects of buildings, structural types, characteristics of the main materials etc.)
Attendance to the Atelier requires design skills and preliminary knowledge that is usually acquired in a standard architecture bachelor (3y) program. The student must have a clear understanding of urban design issues and architectural design fundamentals (distribution, typology, morphology, composition) and a basic knowledge in urban history and architectural history, especially regarding urban morphology and building typology. He/she must have a clear understanding of building and urban physics principles and a basic knowledge of construction principles and building technologies. The student is therefore required to: • Know about the established techniques of representation and communication within the discipline of architecture; both traditional representation techniques (perceptual maps, design sketches, physical models etc.) and digital representation techniques (virtual modelling and rendering etc.). • Know how to independently organize: o the analysis of morphological characteristics of urban form, using cartographic, historical and perceptive reading techniques; o the reading of technological characteristics of buildings (building components, traditional materials etc.) and the analysis of the main environmental and climate variables at a urban and individual building level; o the project at the urban and building scale (with reference to the typological and distributive aspects of buildings, structural types, characteristics of the main materials etc.)
During the first year of the university course in Architecture for Sustainabilty Design, this workshop deals with transformation scenarios in complex areas, whose role for the urban area impacts on strategic development programmes and city redevelopment policies. Therefore, it will be up to the “Transforming Urban Areas”, or, better, the areas “awaiting” transformation, to offer real opportunities for redesigning significant portions of the territory of the city. The project site will be the Frihamnen in Gothenburg, Sweden – a post-industrial harbor site transformation and one of the most prestigious urban projects undertaken in Scandinavia. Frihamnen encompasses a terrain vague of historical significance for the identity of Gothenburg, including a series of warehouses that are protected by heritage codes. With the new Göta River Bridge and the neighboring Ringön area to the northeast, new challenges for urban transformation unfold relating to morphology, access, and navigation. The transformation of Frihamnen, which is co-directed by the City of Gothenburg Planning Department and the public-private developer Älvstranden Utvecklings AB, will be an important occasion for reflection on the introduction of innovative forms and functions related to green mobility, the collective dimension of living, new forms of production and services, the latest and advanced forms of residence, linked to a more effective relationship with sociability and time, as well as innovative prospects in urban morphology and building type. The project goals are: • To conduct urban design of a neighborhood in the post-industrial harbor transformation site Frihamnen in Gothenburg, Sweden, with existing buildings to be adapted to new forms and uses. • To conduct architectural design for a building, which draws on advanced technological, sustainable, and aesthetic premises to propose waterfront development beyond common practices. Architectural and urban design will comply with one or several of the following principles: 1. Hyper diversity, a city with seamless integration of land uses, social and ethnic diversity. 2. Three-dimensional distribution of circulation and program. 3. Innovation at the water’s edge provides public access and business opportunities at the edge. 4. Flexible forms, urban and building, respond to fluctuations in use, economy, and tendency. 5. Energy self-sufficiency based on appropriate strategies defined according to the urban and buildings characteristics. 6. Off-the-grid, self-sufficiency in food- and energy production (solar energy, wind exploitation), active roof-tops, LED farming. 7. Climate responsive, reacts on radical micro-climates and climate change. 8. Public transportation includes surface, air, and water transportation. 9. Housing based on mixed use and tenure. Lectures will address a critical reading of planning tools, in terms of mix-use and morphological foreshadowing of the subsequent urban design. The lectures will be articulated through the drafting of a common masterplan (1 credit), which will be the base for different morphological and distribution solutions (1 credit). Sustainability, seen as the characterising strategy of the project, will be intimately linked to the characters and the language of architecture, from its conceptual formulation to morphological and technological solutions derived from it. Sustainability will be investigated at the level of building settlement, the advanced line of theoretical and design research: occupation of the soil, orientation, and distribution solutions, interaction with climate, territory, road system, public places, organised so as to optimise the sharing and the consumption of resources. The students’ work, starting from the common masterplan, will have to reflect the re-designing mode of an urban portion, thus catalysing the themes of geography and schemes, whether visible or not, that are specific of the design of the new urban plan. The results will highlight the values considered, with reference to consolidated schemes, existing landscapes, and referring to the quality of public spaces, the conservation of resources, the limitation of environmental loads and biocompatibility. An annotated bibliography will be proposed during the workshop. The contribution of Environmental Technological Design course will highlight the role and responsibility of designers in the sustainable transformation of the urban system. The course will include a theoretical part and a planning exercise, conducted in cooperation with the course of urban Architectural and Urban Design and Building Physics. Theoretical communications will touch upon the cultural framework of sustainability, environmental emergency to the resilience strategies, the economic outlook for innovation in technology and society. This part represents the first block of lectures (1 credit). The issues of bioclimatic design and tools for urban and building environmental design will also be presented in the second block of lectures (1 credit). The use of these instruments will be reflected into the activity of the workshop’s design exercise, in particular in urban microclimate analyses, conducted with the building physics course and in the use of mitigation strategies. The Building Physics course will be organized into 2 different functional “blocks”: the first (1 credit of lessons + 2 credits of review) will address the urban-scale project (Climate and site analysis, outdoor space comfort, energy production) the second (1 credit of lessons + 2 credits of review) will focus on the building scale (passive approach, envelope design, energy balance of the building, use of the renewables and energy supply). In developing one of the project phases, the use of current technological tools will be proposed, such as BIM software, with the aim of highlighting the need for a more careful control over the use of economic and material resources, in the framework of architectural design, in line with the principles of sustainability. In the first phase of the Atelier (urban design), design research will be carried out by students organized in small groups (3-5 students), to develop later into individual work (building design). The design research will explore the following topics: 1. Performance Interactive and responsive building components provide flexible uses, acoustic qualities, and identity, improving thermal comfort, safety, and weather protection. Sound, light, and kinetics are new elements in public space. Robots, motors, and drones challenge conventions in scale, action, construction, and duration. 2. Radical climate Located at the fringe of the North Sea, the Frihamnen district is characterized by a harsh micro-climate including strong winds, heavy rainfalls, and stormy seas. Building designs and urban form will react on harsh climatic forces; climate change will catalyze innovation in form and program. 3. Emergent building types Our city will deploy the architecture of emergent building types to respond to challenges in form, use, and finance. The radical increment will mediate between profit driven development and historic preservation; the hybrid building will facilitate seamless integration of land uses; the parasite and the Accessory Dwelling Unit will close the gap between developer conglomerates and DIY processes. 4. Urban food production Hybrid buildings and performative building components act as agents of food production in urban space. Different methods and scales of agriculture will be adopted, such as permaculture, green rooftops, vertical farming, LED farming, and indoor agriculture. Landscape urbanism provides an intellectual framework for urban agriculture in hybrid forms and programs. 5. Urban form The terrain vague of Frihamnen calls for alternative urban forms feasible to balance cultural heritage with the arrangement of new programs, the integration with surrounding areas, and community building. Temporal urban forms may serve intermediate purposes. Architecture will mediate between micro and macro scale urbanism. Porosity, flexibility, and layering will challenge conventions in the design and representation of urban form. 6. Housing Housing will be reconceptualized from dwelling to living. Flexible spaces for live, work, and play will provide the foundation for housing. Equal distribution of tenures will characterize the housing stock at our city. Living spaces will nurture on site specific qualities such as the close proximity to water, the industrial heritage, the views towards the river, the climatological conditions of the North Sea, the relationship to the historic city center, and a vibrant city scape characterized by hyper diversity in trade, commerce, and manufacturing as well as in social, ethnic, and economic configurations. 7. Construction at the water’s edge Habitation at the water’s edge challenges conventions in structure, materiality, climate, and construction. Structural elements such as the retaining walls, cantilevers, and deep foundations will be reconceptualized; jetties, caisson, dry docks, and offshore platforms serve as anchor points for buildings, circulation, public space, and infrastructure. Robots and drones are used to explore new sites of development and construction. 8. Armatures Urban armatures, such as saunas, swimming pools, pavilions, playgrounds, and facilities for temporal uses and performances, foster identity, interaction, and commons. Introducing novelty to mainstream industry, armatures provide frameworks for experiments in form, use, sustainability, fabrication, and aesthetics. 9. Place attachment Place attachment vs. place making. Contextualized in social mobilization and activism, our city will challenge the gentrification processes that tend to infuse waterfront developments in Europe and elsewhere. Urban cultures and identities will be fostered through building together, DIY processes, and urban commons. Relational aesthetics will provide the intellectual framework for social interaction, geometry, trade, sustainable engineering, and communication.
During the first year of the university course in Architecture for Sustainabilty Design, this workshop deals with transformation scenarios in complex areas, whose role for the urban area impacts on strategic development programmes and city redevelopment policies. Therefore, it will be up to the “Transforming Urban Areas”, or, better, the areas “awaiting” transformation, to offer real opportunities for redesigning significant portions of the territory of the city. The project site will be the Frihamnen in Gothenburg, Sweden – a post-industrial harbor site transformation and one of the most prestigious urban projects undertaken in Scandinavia. Frihamnen encompasses a terrain vague of historical significance for the identity of Gothenburg, including a series of warehouses that are protected by heritage codes. With the new Göta River Bridge and the neighboring Ringön area to the northeast, new challenges for urban transformation unfold relating to morphology, access, and navigation. The transformation of Frihamnen, which is co-directed by the City of Gothenburg Planning Department and the public-private developer Älvstranden Utvecklings AB, will be an important occasion for reflection on the introduction of innovative forms and functions related to green mobility, the collective dimension of living, new forms of production and services, the latest and advanced forms of residence, linked to a more effective relationship with sociability and time, as well as innovative prospects in urban morphology and building type. The project goals are: • To conduct urban design of a neighborhood in the post-industrial harbor transformation site Frihamnen in Gothenburg, Sweden, with existing buildings to be adapted to new forms and uses. • To conduct architectural design for a building, which draws on advanced technological, sustainable, and aesthetic premises to propose waterfront development beyond common practices. Architectural and urban design will comply with one or several of the following principles: 1. Hyper diversity, a city with seamless integration of land uses, social and ethnic diversity. 2. Three-dimensional distribution of circulation and program. 3. Innovation at the water’s edge provides public access and business opportunities at the edge. 4. Flexible forms, urban and building, respond to fluctuations in use, economy, and tendency. 5. Energy self-sufficiency based on appropriate strategies defined according to the urban and buildings characteristics. 6. Off-the-grid, self-sufficiency in food- and energy production (solar energy, wind exploitation), active roof-tops, LED farming. 7. Climate responsive, reacts on radical micro-climates and climate change. 8. Public transportation includes surface, air, and water transportation. 9. Housing based on mixed use and tenure. Lectures will address a critical reading of planning tools, in terms of mix-use and morphological foreshadowing of the subsequent urban design. The lectures will be articulated through the drafting of a common masterplan (1 credit), which will be the base for different morphological and distribution solutions (1 credit). Sustainability, seen as the characterising strategy of the project, will be intimately linked to the characters and the language of architecture, from its conceptual formulation to morphological and technological solutions derived from it. Sustainability will be investigated at the level of building settlement, the advanced line of theoretical and design research: occupation of the soil, orientation, and distribution solutions, interaction with climate, territory, road system, public places, organised so as to optimise the sharing and the consumption of resources. The students’ work, starting from the common masterplan, will have to reflect the re-designing mode of an urban portion, thus catalysing the themes of geography and schemes, whether visible or not, that are specific of the design of the new urban plan. The results will highlight the values considered, with reference to consolidated schemes, existing landscapes, and referring to the quality of public spaces, the conservation of resources, the limitation of environmental loads and biocompatibility. An annotated bibliography will be proposed during the workshop. The contribution of Environmental Technological Design course will highlight the role and responsibility of designers in the sustainable transformation of the urban system. The course will include a theoretical part and a planning exercise, conducted in cooperation with the course of urban Architectural and Urban Design and Building Physics. Theoretical communications will touch upon the cultural framework of sustainability, environmental emergency to the resilience strategies, the economic outlook for innovation in technology and society. This part represents the first block of lectures (1 credit). The issues of bioclimatic design and tools for urban and building environmental design will also be presented in the second block of lectures (1 credit). The use of these instruments will be reflected into the activity of the workshop’s design exercise, in particular in urban microclimate analyses, conducted with the building physics course and in the use of mitigation strategies. The Building Physics course will be organized into 2 different functional “blocks”: the first (1 credit of lessons + 2 credits of review) will address the urban-scale project (Climate and site analysis, outdoor space comfort, energy production) the second (1 credit of lessons + 2 credits of review) will focus on the building scale (passive approach, envelope design, energy balance of the building, use of the renewables and energy supply). In developing one of the project phases, the use of current technological tools will be proposed, such as BIM software, with the aim of highlighting the need for a more careful control over the use of economic and material resources, in the framework of architectural design, in line with the principles of sustainability. In the first phase of the Atelier (urban design), design research will be carried out by students organized in small groups (3-5 students), to develop later into individual work (building design). The design research will explore the following topics: 1. Performance Interactive and responsive building components provide flexible uses, acoustic qualities, and identity, improving thermal comfort, safety, and weather protection. Sound, light, and kinetics are new elements in public space. Robots, motors, and drones challenge conventions in scale, action, construction, and duration. 2. Radical climate Located at the fringe of the North Sea, the Frihamnen district is characterized by a harsh micro-climate including strong winds, heavy rainfalls, and stormy seas. Building designs and urban form will react on harsh climatic forces; climate change will catalyze innovation in form and program. 3. Emergent building types Our city will deploy the architecture of emergent building types to respond to challenges in form, use, and finance. The radical increment will mediate between profit driven development and historic preservation; the hybrid building will facilitate seamless integration of land uses; the parasite and the Accessory Dwelling Unit will close the gap between developer conglomerates and DIY processes. 4. Urban food production Hybrid buildings and performative building components act as agents of food production in urban space. Different methods and scales of agriculture will be adopted, such as permaculture, green rooftops, vertical farming, LED farming, and indoor agriculture. Landscape urbanism provides an intellectual framework for urban agriculture in hybrid forms and programs. 5. Urban form The terrain vague of Frihamnen calls for alternative urban forms feasible to balance cultural heritage with the arrangement of new programs, the integration with surrounding areas, and community building. Temporal urban forms may serve intermediate purposes. Architecture will mediate between micro and macro scale urbanism. Porosity, flexibility, and layering will challenge conventions in the design and representation of urban form. 6. Housing Housing will be reconceptualized from dwelling to living. Flexible spaces for live, work, and play will provide the foundation for housing. Equal distribution of tenures will characterize the housing stock at our city. Living spaces will nurture on site specific qualities such as the close proximity to water, the industrial heritage, the views towards the river, the climatological conditions of the North Sea, the relationship to the historic city center, and a vibrant city scape characterized by hyper diversity in trade, commerce, and manufacturing as well as in social, ethnic, and economic configurations. 7. Construction at the water’s edge Habitation at the water’s edge challenges conventions in structure, materiality, climate, and construction. Structural elements such as the retaining walls, cantilevers, and deep foundations will be reconceptualized; jetties, caisson, dry docks, and offshore platforms serve as anchor points for buildings, circulation, public space, and infrastructure. Robots and drones are used to explore new sites of development and construction. 8. Armatures Urban armatures, such as saunas, swimming pools, pavilions, playgrounds, and facilities for temporal uses and performances, foster identity, interaction, and commons. Introducing novelty to mainstream industry, armatures provide frameworks for experiments in form, use, sustainability, fabrication, and aesthetics. 9. Place attachment Place attachment vs. place making. Contextualized in social mobilization and activism, our city will challenge the gentrification processes that tend to infuse waterfront developments in Europe and elsewhere. Urban cultures and identities will be fostered through building together, DIY processes, and urban commons. Relational aesthetics will provide the intellectual framework for social interaction, geometry, trade, sustainable engineering, and communication.
The Atelier aims at introducing students to the current debate and best practice on post-industrial harbor transformation, bringing them into the up-to-date research domain of the team of the tutors. Taking the practices of a high-profile harbor transformation project currently in its early planning phase as intellectual framework, the students will utilize architectural sustainable design to critically approach the concept of contemporary waterfront development. The practical training will facilitate the student in the implementation of innovative solutions, by designing and evaluating their effectiveness and performances. The student activity will integrate urban and architectural design, environmental technology, and technical physics, from the masterplan scale to the building design. Design practice involves a common framework for all design steps: • all activities will result in a clearly identified product (text or graphical work); • the outcome of each activity can be considered a milestone in the development of the overall final design; • at each milestone, design strategies or products are presented to all Atelier members (tutors and students, invited external critics); • these collective discussions and debates are first-stage evaluations, that will end with the final examination. The ability to clearly illustrate and effectively discuss the design products is considered an important outcome, since accurate presentations are fundamental components in current urban programs (consultation and negotiation processes). Study trip A three-day study trip to the Frihamnen site in Gothenburg, Sweden, will be part of the Atelier program, where the students will visit and conduct research on site. During the study trip, the student will participate in events and lectures by experts and staff from the Departments of City Planning in Gothenburg, from the public/private developer Älvstranden Utvecklings AB, and other experts: the study trip will include intensive design collaborations and presentations.
During the first year of the university course in Architecture for Sustainability Design, this workshop deals with transformation scenarios in complex areas, whose role for the urban area impacts on strategic development programs and city redevelopment policies. Therefore, it will be up to the "Transforming Urban Areas", or, better, the areas "awaiting" transformation, to offer real opportunities for redesigning significant portions of the territory of the city. The main scope is to transform (in)formal urban areas into resilient territories in other words to convert the Violent city into a Biolent city. Theoretical and Methodological Approach: The contemporary Latin American city cannot be read as a close set with clear urban limits. Walls, urban gates, left behind in the conformation of territories demarcated by the extended operation of transport infrastructures (airports, ports, highways - freeways) and more complex logics (traffic of goods and services, contraband, extortion, informal commerce, among others). This legacy of the late modernity of our society makes the reading of a territory as a constellation of discontinuous fragments, but territorially and socially united or complementary. It is important to establish some starting points on the methodology of territorial, landscape, urban and architectural project in order to approach the production of a specific work route always framed in the academic field. The three proposed definitions will be elaborated in relation to the territory studied (Cartagena) precisely because of their way of constituting landscapes or special relationships, these are: The limit, the border and the frontier. Each of these words, in principle can be confused as synonyms or at least as quite close concepts. However, we would like to differentiate them and work them as dissimilar concepts: The limit refers to the line or point. Etymologically, it comes from the Latin limes which means, border or edge, however, as we will explain later, we will try to give them different approaches. The territory is structured based on limits. The characterization and elements of geography (or the natural landscape) are always proposed as the limits of a place (rivers, mountains, among others). In the urban landscape, the relationship between public and private represents the clearest of distinctions when working on the city scale. Private property demarcates and differs from the public and vice versa. It is the conformation of one, which establishes the spatiality of the other. The delimitation of private property is full of conceptual portions with the etymology of limit. The boundary, the delimitation, in short, a family of words close to the idea of the demarcation of the territory separating the own from the foreign. It exists in the word, the law or the culture, and it stands as fences, walls; is spatial or imaginary. The edge etymologically has two roots. We are interested in raising both because they allow us to understand the differentiation with the limit. The first of the roots is close to the shore from the French bord. The second and more interesting for the theoretical proposal of this studio, is the Latin root burdus, which means thickness. The edge (borde in Spanish) beyond the notion of limit as line or succession of points, physically manifests in its thickness. In this sense we remember the reference of edge proposed by Kevin Lynch, in The Image of the City (1960), where one of the components that structure the idea of the urban landscape is the edge. A large wall of buildings complies with the rule of manifesting, from one or several limits, the notion of edge, that is, it acquires thickness. We must clarify that we refer to architectural or morpho-typological thickness. Finally, the frontier (frontera in Spanish) is the most interesting definition from the concepts to address the definitions of the contemporary territories and the landscape they build. To explain this concept, we will take the approach of Yury Lotman (1960), who has studied this definition from semiotics in different cultures. The author states that, just as nature has spatial closures (biosphere, atmosphere), human beings possess cultural or mental closures. These are changeable, expand or acquire permeability. Lotman, tries to complement the definition of Noosphere already established by Teilhanrd by coining a new definition for this position on the frontier: the Semiosphere (no translation for this term). The Place This period we will be focused on Cartagena de Indias (Colombia) as one of the most interesting sectors in terms of the construction of an adaptation of very sensitive areas from the social point of view, and the interaction with the water fronts. We will work specifically with a territory that has been part of the process of urban growth in the intermediate Colombian cities as a result of violence (in recent decades) and in the search for sources of work and survival of these processes. The occupation of the territory has manifested itself as a process of growth along the water fronts, having a direct impact water bodies of rivers and lagoons, which have provided a constant deterioration of the ecological structure of the territory, but also establishing precarious and insecure social conditions. The work will be based on scales in the search to create spatial solutions that can establish alternatives to the central topics of this workshop: Resilient territories. The way to do this approximation by scales will be traced in the point phases that will be described later. However, it is appropriate to clarify that the phases of work and therefore their scales, will be determined by the three definitions explained above: limit, border and borders. Cartagena de Indias, or just Cartagena, is located in the north of the country, specifically on the colombian atlantic ocean front. The coast towards the caribbean sea and a system of wetlands, swamps, mangrove forests, rivers and streams, describes its geographical conformation since its foundation in the S.XVI (1533). In this territory collides different models of the city, from the medieval historic city, consisting of a great military wall and some fortifications, which allowed it to become a recollection center of great treasures extracted at the time of the spanish conquest. Its contemporary expansions demarcate the social reality of our latin-american society, on the one hand, the city of large and tall buildings, where commercial complexes and beautiful apartments emerge daily, but, on the other hand, the formation of informal territories that are increasingly adding more to the expansion and occupation of the territory. It is precisely this geographical and territorial configuration that has configured very specific forms of occupation in the most powerful city from the tourist point of view in Colombia (UNESCO World Heritage, 1984). Every day the people who come looking for better opportunities occupy the territory in places never thought for. The edge of the Cienaga de la Virgen (Barrio Boston) is one of the most exemplary spaces of this process. Tons of rubble and rubbish settle on the lagoon to gain every day centimeters of new ground where the new settlers will be. This process of degradation of the ecosystem quality of the water bodies, together with more delicate processes such as the deforestation of the mangroves, is an evident and violent collision between a social need and therefore a constellation of rich and own cultural practices, with natural agents that must be preserved. This is the great diatribe that we must face this semester: How to move from this violent relationship to one that allows the interaction of both, preparing the territory for the future (from Violent to Biolent)? Let's not forget to put on the agenda the problems of a society with many years of deficiencies in public policies around its habitat (social infrastructure, housing, services, recreation among others, or what we call: social infrastructure), versus, unpostponable problems such as global warming, the sea level rise, the increase in temperature, among others.
Specific bibliography will be provided during the course, in order to address the students’ work in a more specific way, according to the themes raised during the course and specific interests. A first reading list is provided hereby. Further bibliographic references will be provided during the course. Regular reading of current international architectural sources (reviews, websites, books) is required to nurture individual design research. • Baietto, A. and R. Rigamonti. Tessuti misti nella città compatta. Torino: Celid, 2003 • Baum, M. and K. Christiaanse (eds). City as a Loft. Adaptive Reuse as a resource for sustainable urban development. Zurich: GTA Verlag, 202. • Bourriaud, Nicolas. Relational Aesthetics. Dijon: Les Presses Du Reel, 1998. • Bourriaud, N. The radicant. New York: Lukas & Sternberg, 2009. • Braae, E. Beauty redeemed: Recycling post-industrial landscapes. Basel: Birkhauser, 2015 • City of Gothenburg. RiverCity Gothenburg Vision. Gothenburg: City of Gothenburg, 2012. • City of Gothenburg & Raumlaborberlin. Public space & bathing culture. Gothenburg: City of Gothenburg, 2015. • Cuff D. and P-J Dahl. Housing in the RiverCity: Rethinking Place and Process. Gothenburg: Mistra Urban Futures, 2015. • Cuff, D. and R. Sherman (eds). Fast-Forward Urbanism: Rethinking Architecture's Engagement with the City. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2011. • Dahl, C. and P-J Dahl. "The Celebration of Co-Creation." Topos 94 (2016): 40-47. • Dahl, C. “Gothenburg’s Jublieumsparken 0.5 and Frihamnen: Explorations into the Aesthetic of DIY.” SPOOL 3, no. 2 (2016): 73-86. • Dahl, P-J. “Exploring Design Potentials in Porous Urban Space: Split Vision Urbanism HK through Montage.” In Beyond Ism: The Landscape of Landscape Urbanism, edited by Caroline Dahl, Lisa Diedrich, Gunilla Lindholm, Vera Vicenzotti and Nina Vogel, 117-24. Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Science, 2016. • Diedrich, Lisa. "Translating Harbourscapes: Site-Specific Design Approaches in Contemporary European Harbour Transformation." Dissertation, University of Copenhagen, 2013. • Gauzin-Muller, D. Architettura sostenibile. Milano: Edizioni Ambiente, 2003. • Martì Aris, C. Le variazioni dell’identità. Barcellona: Citta Studi, 1996. • Mayne, Thom. "Combinatory Urbanism: The Complex Behavior of Collective Form." In Combinatory Urbanism: The Complex Behavior of Collective Form, edited by Stephanie Rigolot, 27-52. Culver City, CA: Stray Dog Café, 2011. • Pollo, R. Progettare l’ambiente urbano. Roma: Carocci, 2015. • Robiglio, M. “The adaptive reuse toolkit. How cities can turn their industrial legacy into infrastructure for innovation and growth.” Washington DC: GMF, 2016. • Waldheim, Charles. Landscape as Urbanism: A General Theory. New York: Princeton University Press, 2016. • ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, Air conditioning Engineers) handbooks: "Fundamentals and HVAC Applications". • Haines, R.W., Wilson, C. L., "HVAC systems design handbook" - 5rd ed. (McGraw-Hill) New York • Watson, D., editor (1993), "The Energy Design Handbook". AIA Press, Washington DC.
Specific bibliography will be provided during the course in every phase, according to the themes raised during the course and specific interests. This is general list of lectures and bibliographic references: - Abalos, Iñaki (2009). Naturaleza y Artifício. Gustavo Gili. Barcelona, España. - Balcells, Conxita y Bru, Josepa (2002). Alongside/Al lado de. Ediciones Gustavo Gili. Barcelona, España. - Bookchin, Murray (1974). Los Límites de la Ciudad. H. Blume Ediciones, Madrid, España. - Canclini Garcïa, Néstor (1997). Imaginarios Urbanos. Ediciones Eudeba. Buenos Aires, Argentina. - Careri, Francesco (2002). Walkscapes: el andar como práctica estética. Ediciones Gustavo Gili. Barcelona, España. - Clement, Gilles (2007). El Jardín en Movimiento. Ediciones Gustavo Gili. Barcelona, España. - Corner, James (2014). Tha Landscape Imgination. Princeton Architectural Press. Estados Unidos. - Cuff, D. and R. Sherman (eds). Fast-Forward Urbanism: Rethinking Architecture's Engagement with the City. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2011. - Dahl, P-J. "Exploring Design Potentials in Porous Urban Space: Split Vision Urbanism HK through Montage." In Beyond Ism: The Landscape of Landscape Urbanism, edited by Caroline Dahl, Lisa Diedrich, Gunilla Lindholm, Vera Vicenzotti and Nina Vogel, 117-24. Alnarp: Swedish University of Agricultural Science, 2016. - Dameri, Annalisa; Giordano, Roberto; Mellano, Pablo; Rodelo, Luz Mery; Rossi, Claudio. The Culture of the City, Politecnico di Torino. Italy, 2018. - Gauzin-Muller, D. Architettura sostenibile. Milano: Edizioni Ambiente, 2003. - Ibelings, Hans (1989). Paisajes Artificiales. Editorial Gustavo Gili. Barcelona. - Mayne, Thom. "Combinatory Urbanism: The Complex Behavior of Collective Form." In Combinatory Urbanism: The Complex Behavior of Collective Form, edited by Stephanie Rigolot, 27-52. Culver City, CA: Stray Dog Café, 2011. - Munizaga Vigil, Gustavo (1993). Macroarquitectura: Tipologías y Estrategias de Desarrollo Urbano. Ediciones Universidad Católica De Chile. - Nadal, Sara y Puig, Carles (2002). Around/Alrededor de. Ediciones Gustavo Gili. Barcelona, España. - Powel, Kenneth (2000). La Transformación de la ciudad. Leopold Blume Ediciones. - Quaderns (2003b). El inconsciente suburbano. Revista Quaderns 237. Barcelona - Quaderns (2002b). Ciudad Usada II. Revista Quaderns 235. Barcelona - Quaderns (2001a). Paisajes Urbanos. Revista Quaderns 228. Barcelona. - Quaderns (2001b). En Tránsito. Revista Quaderns 231. Barcelona. - Quaderns (1997a). Debates Centrales Forum Internacional 1. Revista Quaderns 213. Barcelona. - Quaderns (1997b). Debates Centrales Forum Internacional 2. Revista Quaderns 214. Barcelona. - Rosell, Quim (2002). Afterwards /Después de. Ediciones Gustavo Gili. Barcelona, España. - Steenbergen, Clemens (2005). Composing Landscapes. Birkhauser, Alemania. - Tzonis, Alexander (1977). Hacia un ambiente opresivo. H. Blume Ediciones, Madrid, España. - Wacquant, Loïc (2001). Parias urbanos. Ediciones Manantial. Buenos Aires, Argentina. - Waldheim, Charles. Landscape as Urbanism: A General Theory. New York: Princeton University Press, 2016. - Watson, D., editor (1993), "The Energy Design Handbook". AIA Press, Washington DC. - Zhu, J.; Meikle, S.; Walker, J.; Sassen, S.; Coombes, A. C.; Bernadó, J. Y Ruano, M. (1999). Instant China: Notas sobre una transformación urbana. En Revista 2G No 10 1999/II. Ediciones Gustavo Gili Other texts: - Barcelona espai públic: homenaje a Josep Maria Serra Martí'. Barcelona: Ajuntament de Barcelona, 1993. ISBN: 84-7609-589-9. - Biennal de Paisatge (2a: 2001: Barcelona, Catalunya). 'Jardines insurgentes: arquitectura del paisaje en Europa = Gardens in arms: landscape architecture in Europe: 1996-2000: catálogo de la 2a bienal europea de Paisaje 2001= catalogue of the 2nd european landscape biennial 2001'. Barcelona: Fundació Caja de Arquitectos: Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya: UPC, 2002. - BORJA, Jordi (2003). La ciudad conquistada. Alianza Editorial, Barcelona - BUSQUETS, Joan, CORREA, Felipe (2006). Ciudades X formas: una nueva mirada hacia el proyecto urbanístico. Harvard University-Graduate School of Desgin, Nicolodi Editore. - GARCÍA VÁZQUEZ, C. (2004). Ciudad Hojaldre. Visiones urbanas del siglo XXI. Editorial Gustavo Pili, Barcelona. - ORDEIG CORSINI, José María. (2004). Diseño urbano y pensamiento contemporáneo. Instituto Monsa de Ediciones, Barcelona. - Solà-Morales i Rubió. Manuel. Espacios públicos y espacios colectivos: un nuevo reto, urbanizar lo privado. 'La Vanguardia', Suplemento 12/05/1992. Pág 4 i 5 - Solà-Morales Rubió, Manuel de. 'Las Formas de crecimiento urbano'. Barcelona: UPC, 1997. ISBN 84- 830-1197-2.
Modalità di esame: Elaborato grafico individuale; Elaborato grafico prodotto in gruppo; Progetto individuale; Progetto di gruppo;
Exam criteria, rules and procedures The Atelier/Workshop implies a regular participation that will lead to an individual judgment. The activities will be monitored through interim evaluation, in particular focusing on the development of a comprehensive and Masterplan and, later, a scale design of a building. The interim assessment will concur in the final grade, complementing the presentation and discussion of final design product. Atelier activities are carried out by students in groups and individually. At the end of the Workshop, all the work done will be presented, collectively discussed and assessed. The exam will be characterized by a group design development and individual insights into the building scale. The final assessment generates a single mark, on the basis of the collective final discussion and evaluation of each discipline dealt with during the Workshop; marks will be assigned according to each student’s credits.
Exam: Individual graphic design project; Group graphic design project; Individual project; Group project;
Esporta Word


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