Servizi per la didattica
PORTALE DELLA DIDATTICA

Comparative City History

01SOYQA

A.A. 2019/20

Course Language

English

Course degree

Master of science-level of the Bologna process in Territorial, Urban, Environmental And Landscape Planning - Torino

Course structure
Teaching Hours
Lezioni 40
Esercitazioni in aula 20
Teachers
Teacher Status SSD h.Les h.Ex h.Lab h.Tut Years teaching
Volpiano Mauro Professore Associato ICAR/18 40 0 0 0 2
Teaching assistant
Espandi

Context
SSD CFU Activities Area context
ICAR/18 6 B - Caratterizzanti Urbanistica e pianificazione
2019/20
Comparative City History is a broad-ranging thematic course that aims to explore some crucial aspects of urban history through time providing a wide set of case studies. The course explores cities’ history through cross-cutting topics by analyzing processes of urban development in a wide geographical and cultural framework and from a long-term perspective. Facing the general trend of globalization of cities, this course focuses on comparativeness between cities for identifying common parallel dynamics at the same periods by a historic approach. The aim is to analyze the process of changes at certain periods by enlightening peculiarities and specificities of single cities at the same time. The course will investigate specific themes as representative of the turn of urban history by key case studies. The chronology deals from the ancient to contemporary cities. Case studies will be analyzed in a comparative perspective for mapping general/specific urban phenomena. Traces of those stories will also be identified in the current cities by focusing on related memories and cultural heritage. Discussing changing urban heritage conceptions will be one of the main aims, preparatory also for the courses of the following semester. Although the focus will be on the European area, case studies will also include certain cities outside Europe. The purpose will be to introduce more factors of comparativeness in meaningful cultural areas for the transmission of models. On the one hand, the course will analyze both the built environment and open spaces by focusing on some specific urban settings. On the other hand, the social and cultural impact of urban changes will be explored. The methodology of teaching will encourage students’ interaction.
Comparative City History is a broad-ranging thematic course that aims to explore some crucial aspects of urban history through time providing a wide set of case studies. The course explores cities’ history through cross-cutting topics by analyzing processes of urban development in a wide geographical and cultural framework and from a long-term perspective. Facing the general trend of globalization of cities, this course focuses on comparativeness between cities for identifying common parallel dynamics at the same periods by a historic approach. The aim is to analyze the process of changes at certain periods by enlightening peculiarities and specificities of single cities at the same time. The course will investigate specific themes as representative of the turn of urban history by key case studies. The chronology deals from the ancient to contemporary cities. Case studies will be analyzed in a comparative perspective for mapping general/specific urban phenomena. Traces of those stories will also be identified in the current cities by focusing on related memories and cultural heritage. Discussing changing urban heritage conceptions will be one of the main aims, preparatory also for the courses of the following semester. Although the focus will be on the European area, case studies will also include certain cities outside Europe. The purpose will be to introduce more factors of comparativeness in meaningful cultural areas for the transmission of models. On the one hand, the course will analyze both the built environment and open spaces by focusing on some specific urban settings. On the other hand, the social and cultural impact of urban changes will be explored. The methodology of teaching will encourage students’ interaction.
The student will gain an appropriate methodology and terminology, using the most important concepts and approaches of the historic disciplines in an updated and critical way, in a wide diachronic range. At the end of the course, students will be able to use in operational terms the critical knowledge which they have gained (i.e.: ability to read, interpret and set up historical analysis of the city, to identify the range of documentation available at different periods, and to recognise the historical context of main urban transformation processes, and to link them to the notion of cultural heritage). Students will acquire multiple knowledge and skills concerning in particular: − The formal and functional characters of a historic urban structure; − The ability to recognize the historical characters of city development; − The tools for the interpretation of the historical town planning; − The knowledge of cities in history and the relationship between urbanization and social and economic developments in and beyond Europe; − The knowledge of important historical, social and economic questions, debates and concepts on urban history; − How to identify and recognize distinctive and comparable elements of peculiarities on solid history-based knowledge and methodology; By the end of the course, the student should organize and use relatively large amounts of information and reflect critically on knowledge and understanding as presented in academic literature. Students should also have gained a clear sense of the making of historic environments and their cultural value.
The student will gain an appropriate methodology and terminology, using the most important concepts and approaches of the historic disciplines in an updated and critical way, in a wide diachronic range. At the end of the course, students will be able to use in operational terms the critical knowledge which they have gained (i.e.: ability to read, interpret and set up historical analysis of the city, to identify the range of documentation available at different periods, and to recognise the historical context of main urban transformation processes, and to link them to the notion of cultural heritage). Students will acquire multiple knowledge and skills concerning in particular: − The formal and functional characters of a historic urban structure; − The ability to recognize the historical characters of city development; − The tools for the interpretation of the historical town planning; − The knowledge of cities in history and the relationship between urbanization and social and economic developments in and beyond Europe; − The knowledge of important historical, social and economic questions, debates and concepts on urban history; − How to identify and recognize distinctive and comparable elements of peculiarities on solid history-based knowledge and methodology; By the end of the course, the student should organize and use relatively large amounts of information and reflect critically on knowledge and understanding as presented in academic literature. Students should also have gained a clear sense of the making of historic environments and their cultural value.
The student must have acquired in previous training skills and knowledge mainly related to the basic technical elements of architecture and urban planning, the basic concepts of urban history and history of architecture, the system of local institutions, the urban planning governance and the basic elements of urban sociology. Particularly, a basic understanding of the history of the town in Western Europe and the Mediterranean basin is required, with some knowledge about the history of the main international cities. Also, the preliminary approach to urban history and to the history of urban planning is welcome, in addition to the knowledge offered by the school education and the BA degree.
The student must have acquired in previous training skills and knowledge mainly related to the basic technical elements of architecture and urban planning, the basic concepts of urban history and history of architecture, the system of local institutions, the urban planning governance and the basic elements of urban sociology. Particularly, a basic understanding of the history of the town in Western Europe and the Mediterranean basin is required, with some knowledge about the history of the main international cities. Also, the preliminary approach to urban history and to the history of urban planning is welcome, in addition to the knowledge offered by the school education and the BA degree.
The course deals with cities analyzed in a comparative perspective from the Ancient to the contemporary age, examining specific topics presented through case studies and approached by a synchronic or diachronic perspective. An introduction to urban history, its critical approach, terminology and definitions (“History of urbanism”, “History of the city” and “Urban history”) will be provided. A focus on the city of Torino, the former capital of the State of the House of Savoy and first Italian capital city will also be provided, again in a comparative approach considering other European and non-European cities. This year, the course will also be integrated by the seminar "Narration of the city: a multidisciplinary path of knowledge between historical sources and media narrative", partially developed in a field trip in Padova and Venice. Course program Global cities of the Antiquity and in the Medieval Age - Greek and Roman cities in the ancient Mediterranean area - Athens, Rome, Constantinople in the Late Antiquity Compared medieval cities - Serialization and peculiarities in the planned and organic growth towns - Urban life in European centers - The market places and the networks of commerce in European cities Ancient and Modern in the city of the Renaissance - Books and buildings. The Roman heritage and the quest for Antiquity in XV-XVI century - Defining public spaces in the Renaissance - Reimagining the city as a whole Landscapes of power: designing towns and territory in the absolutistic age - Capital cities: setting the scenography for the State - “Lieux du pouvoir” and places for living in XVII-XVIII Europe - Countryside and landscape. Projecting the absolutistic power outside the city Birth of planning. Metaphors and reality at the rise of the contemporary city (1750-1900) - Revolutions - The city of the physician: cure and surgery - The city of the engineer: organizing, specializing, zoning, networking - Cities at war: fortification and defense The urban past: myth, legitimation, identity or heritage? - The dreamt city. Far urban worlds as seen by foreign travellers - Capital cities and the nation-building process in XIX century - Urban renewals between radical and empirical approaches - The old town can teach us something: Civic Art from Sitte to Hegemann (and beyond) - Resilient cities at war and their reconstruction - Inventing the “historic center”: Italy since 1945 Global? - China in Europe. A cultural and architectural history - Europe outside Europe. Urban paradigms, influences, fascination - International style(s) - Colonialism and urban planning - Towards an urban history for the global cities of today: experiencing Tokyo - Global and local. Policies, approaches and current challenges of world urban heritage preservation
The course deals with cities analyzed in a comparative perspective from the Ancient to the contemporary age, examining specific topics presented through case studies and approached by a synchronic or diachronic perspective. An introduction to urban history, its critical approach, terminology and definitions (“History of urbanism”, “History of the city” and “Urban history”) will be provided. A focus on the city of Torino, the former capital of the State of the House of Savoy and first Italian capital city will also be provided, again in a comparative approach considering other European and non-European cities. This year, the course will also be integrated by the seminar "Narration of the city: a multidisciplinary path of knowledge between historical sources and media narrative", partially developed in a field trip in Padova and Venice. Course program Global cities of the Antiquity and in the Medieval Age - Greek and Roman cities in the ancient Mediterranean area - Athens, Rome, Constantinople in the Late Antiquity Compared medieval cities - Serialization and peculiarities in the planned and organic growth towns - Urban life in European centers - The market places and the networks of commerce in European cities Ancient and Modern in the city of the Renaissance - Books and buildings. The Roman heritage and the quest for Antiquity in XV-XVI century - Defining public spaces in the Renaissance - Reimagining the city as a whole Landscapes of power: designing towns and territory in the absolutistic age - Capital cities: setting the scenography for the State - “Lieux du pouvoir” and places for living in XVII-XVIII Europe - Countryside and landscape. Projecting the absolutistic power outside the city Birth of planning. Metaphors and reality at the rise of the contemporary city (1750-1900) - Revolutions - The city of the physician: cure and surgery - The city of the engineer: organizing, specializing, zoning, networking - Cities at war: fortification and defense The urban past: myth, legitimation, identity or heritage? - The dreamt city. Far urban worlds as seen by foreign travellers - Capital cities and the nation-building process in XIX century - Urban renewals between radical and empirical approaches - The old town can teach us something: Civic Art from Sitte to Hegemann (and beyond) - Resilient cities at war and their reconstruction - Inventing the “historic center”: Italy since 1945 Global? - China in Europe. A cultural and architectural history - Europe outside Europe. Urban paradigms, influences, fascination - International style(s) - Colonialism and urban planning - Towards an urban history for the global cities of today: experiencing Tokyo - Global and local. Policies, approaches and current challenges of world urban heritage preservation
The course will be integrated by the seminar "Narration of the city: a multidisciplinary path of knowledge between historical sources and media narrative", partially developed in a field trip in Padova and Venice. The theme of the seminar taking place between Turin, Padua and Venice is the narration-representation of the historic city, a topic that has crossed history with very different means, interpretations and outcomes: the travel stories of Arab and Western cities in the Middle Ages, the drawn tables and the iconography of the great illustrated atlases of the Modern Age, up to photography and cinema that witness the twentieth-century transformations of the immense urban suburbs and of the depopulated historical centers. Historical cities are the protagonists of diversified forms of narration and representation, and they are also described in the most up-to-date digital forms, from cinema to apps. The seminar includes a part of preparatory teaching activity in the classroom, through lectures on the subject and a seminar trip between Padua and Venice that will allow getting to know the two cities through research projects and different narratives, from the storytelling to the digital restitution up to the augmented reality. Participation in the seminar is an integral part of the course attendance and will be assessed with a final exercise activity.
The course will be integrated by the seminar "Narration of the city: a multidisciplinary path of knowledge between historical sources and media narrative", partially developed in a field trip in Padova and Venice. The theme of the seminar taking place between Turin, Padua and Venice is the narration-representation of the historic city, a topic that has crossed history with very different means, interpretations and outcomes: the travel stories of Arab and Western cities in the Middle Ages, the drawn tables and the iconography of the great illustrated atlases of the Modern Age, up to photography and cinema that witness the twentieth-century transformations of the immense urban suburbs and of the depopulated historical centers. Historical cities are the protagonists of diversified forms of narration and representation, and they are also described in the most up-to-date digital forms, from cinema to apps. The seminar includes a part of preparatory teaching activity in the classroom, through lectures on the subject and a seminar trip between Padua and Venice that will allow getting to know the two cities through research projects and different narratives, from the storytelling to the digital restitution up to the augmented reality. Participation in the seminar is an integral part of the course attendance and will be assessed with a final exercise activity.
The course will include ex-cathedra lessons and seminars. A debate will follow each lesson. Experts may be invited to give lectures on specific matters. The course may also provide some guided visits in the Piedmont area.
The course will include ex-cathedra lessons and seminars. A debate will follow each lesson. Experts may be invited to give lectures on specific matters. The course may also provide some guided visits in the Piedmont area.
Bibliographical references will be specified step-by-step during the teaching course. The basic material (in the form of handouts and collections of documents) both for the lessons and exercises will be available, through the course web-portal. Students are also expected to take advantage of the bibliographic resources available at the Politecnico Libraries. An introductory bibliography is established as follows; the knowledge of only some parts specifically indicated for the students will be required. Francesco Bandarin and Ron Van Oers, The historic urban landscape. Managing heritage in an urban century, Wiley-Backwell, Chichester 2012, pp. 1-73 Peter Clark, The Oxford Handbook of Cities in World History, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2013 Lewis Mumford, The City in History: Its Origins, Its Transformations, and Its Prospects, Mariner Books, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (1961) 1968. Thomas Hall, Planning Europe's Capital Cities, Routledge 2010.
Bibliographical references will be specified step-by-step during the teaching course. The basic material (in the form of handouts and collections of documents) both for the lessons and exercises will be available, through the course web-portal. Students are also expected to take advantage of the bibliographic resources available at the Politecnico Libraries. An introductory bibliography is established as follows; the knowledge of only some parts specifically indicated for the students will be required. Francesco Bandarin and Ron Van Oers, The historic urban landscape. Managing heritage in an urban century, Wiley-Backwell, Chichester 2012, pp. 1-73 Peter Clark, The Oxford Handbook of Cities in World History, Oxford University Press, Oxford 2013 Lewis Mumford, The City in History: Its Origins, Its Transformations, and Its Prospects, Mariner Books, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (1961) 1968. Thomas Hall, Planning Europe's Capital Cities, Routledge 2010.
Modalità di esame: prova scritta; prova orale obbligatoria;
The exam will consist of a written and an oral test, with an evaluation on a 30 point scale . 1. The general part of the course will be the subject of a written test. The student will be asked to use correct terminology and a critical approach, within the frame of up to date historiography. The written text will consist of a multiple choice questionnaire about the topics discussed in the lessons. Written exam will count for 50% of the final grade, it will last 30 MINUTES and no specific didactic tools or materials are required. 2. The oral exam will consist of two questions, one concerning the personal deepening of a case-study in the context of the annual seminar (25% of the final grade), the other focusing on the critical knowledge of a text from the bibliography and the related notions discussed during the course (25% of the final grade). The oral exam will last 20-30 minutes and the a digital presentation is required with Powerpoint or similar open source software) Description of the objectives that the examination intends to ascertain, consistently with the declared "expected learning outcomes": The final examination aims at verifying the student ability to read, interpret and set up historical analysis of the city in local and global perspective; to identify the range of documentation and historic sources available at different periods; to recognise the historical context of main urban transformation processes, linking them to the notion of cultural heritage as developed by the current international cultural debate. The final examination aims also at verifying specific skills that the students should have acquired or consolidated in the course, concerning in particular: − The comprehension of the formal and functional characters of a historic urban structure; − The ability "to read" the contemporary city recognising the historical characters of city development based on maps and other sources; − The ability to use traditional and digital tools and methodologies for the analysis and interpretation of the historical town planning; − The ability to identify and recognize distinctive and comparable urban elements in a global perspective using a solid history-based approach.
Exam: written test; compulsory oral exam;
The exam will consist of a written and an oral test, with an evaluation on a 30 point scale . 1. The general part of the course will be the subject of a written test. The student will be asked to use correct terminology and a critical approach, within the frame of up to date historiography. The written text will consist of a multiple choice questionnaire about the topics discussed in the lessons. Written exam will count for 50% of the final grade, it will last 30 MINUTES and no specific didactic tools or materials are required. 2. The oral exam will consist of two questions, one concerning the personal deepening of a case-study in the context of the annual seminar (25% of the final grade), the other focusing on the critical knowledge of a text from the bibliography and the related notions discussed during the course (25% of the final grade). The oral exam will last 20-30 minutes and the a digital presentation is required with Powerpoint or similar open source software) Description of the objectives that the examination intends to ascertain, consistently with the declared "expected learning outcomes": The final examination aims at verifying the student ability to read, interpret and set up historical analysis of the city in local and global perspective; to identify the range of documentation and historic sources available at different periods; to recognise the historical context of main urban transformation processes, linking them to the notion of cultural heritage as developed by the current international cultural debate. The final examination aims also at verifying specific skills that the students should have acquired or consolidated in the course, concerning in particular: − The comprehension of the formal and functional characters of a historic urban structure; − The ability "to read" the contemporary city recognising the historical characters of city development based on maps and other sources; − The ability to use traditional and digital tools and methodologies for the analysis and interpretation of the historical town planning; − The ability to identify and recognize distinctive and comparable urban elements in a global perspective using a solid history-based approach.


© Politecnico di Torino
Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino, ITALY
m@il