Servizi per la didattica
PORTALE DELLA DIDATTICA

Architecture Design Studio

01SUHLU

A.A. 2019/20

Course Language

English

Course degree

1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Architecture - Torino

Course structure
Teaching Hours
Lezioni 40
Esercitazioni in aula 20
Tutoraggio 35
Teachers
Teacher Status SSD h.Les h.Ex h.Lab h.Tut Years teaching
Barello Luca Docente esterno e/o collaboratore   40 40 0 0 1
Teaching assistant
Espandi

Context
SSD CFU Activities Area context
ICAR/14 6 B - Caratterizzanti Progettazione architettonica e urbana
2019/20
The laboratory is the student's first contact with architectural design. The teaching is therefore proposed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to be able to recognize and design spaces at ARCHITECTURAL scale, also in relation to a deliberately simplified context and program. The articulation of the educational path in several consecutive thematic exercises allows the student to measure himself with the fundamentals of design, progressively approaching the complexity of the architectural project in its entirety. The first Atelier thus introduces the sequence of interdisciplinary design laboratories in which the Bachelor degree is structured.
The laboratory is the student's first contact with architectural design. The teaching is therefore proposed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to be able to recognize and design spaces at ARCHITECTURAL scale, also in relation to a deliberately simplified context and program. The articulation of the educational path in several consecutive thematic exercises allows the student to measure himself with the fundamentals of design, progressively approaching the complexity of the architectural project in its entirety. The first Atelier thus introduces the sequence of interdisciplinary design laboratories in which the Bachelor degree is structured.
The knowledge and skills whose actual acquisition will be verified during the examination are structured around four thematical axes: 1 Space: Knowledge: types and characters of the three-dimensional space Skills: knowing how to read, break down and compose the three-dimensional space into simple units and complex configurations; know how to recognize the different types of spaces 2 Distribution characters: Knowledge: elementary residential distributive characters Skills: to know how to analyse the organization of circulation in simple spaces and therefore to compose elementary distribution schemes 3 Design references: Knowledge: references for the project Skills: knowing how to recognize, choose and consciously redesign design references 4 Principles of constructive morphology: Regarding the structure: Knowledge: skin/structure relationship Skills: recognizing the different possible structural configurations of a simple architecture, proposing and developing the structural form in relation to the characteristics of the space and to the organization of the distribution. Regarding construction techniques: Knowledge: relationship between fundamental constructive principles and architectural image Skills: recognizing and using the fundamental building principles and the architectural meaning of the specific technologies of a simple architecture, and to develop its application in coherence with the other aspects of the project.
The knowledge and skills whose actual acquisition will be verified during the examination are structured around four thematical axes: 1 Space: Knowledge: types and characters of the three-dimensional space Skills: knowing how to read, break down and compose the three-dimensional space into simple units and complex configurations; know how to recognize the different types of spaces 2 Distribution characters: Knowledge: elementary residential distributive characters Skills: to know how to analyse the organization of circulation in simple spaces and therefore to compose elementary distribution schemes 3 Design references: Knowledge: references for the project Skills: knowing how to recognize, choose and consciously redesign design references 4 Principles of constructive morphology: Regarding the structure: Knowledge: skin/structure relationship Skills: recognizing the different possible structural configurations of a simple architecture, proposing and developing the structural form in relation to the characteristics of the space and to the organization of the distribution. Regarding construction techniques: Knowledge: relationship between fundamental constructive principles and architectural image Skills: recognizing and using the fundamental building principles and the architectural meaning of the specific technologies of a simple architecture, and to develop its application in coherence with the other aspects of the project.
Easily managing the fundamentals of geometric design in terms of orthogonal projections and projective geometry, Discerning and representing scales and dimensions of architectural space through manual tools. Skilfully using the sketch as a tool for representation and conception of space. Knowing how to make simple physical three-dimensional models with low cost and easily manipulated materials (paper, balsa, polystyrene, cardboard, plasticine etc.) Students are asked to keep a sketch book and graphic notes from the beginning of the first semester to document his/her introduction to architecture, both through elaborations linked to the contents of the courses of the first semester, both through independent research. The notebook will accompany the student during the atelier, documenting in graphic form the individual path of introduction to the project. The notebook is subject to evaluation during the final exam.
Easily managing the fundamentals of geometric design in terms of orthogonal projections and projective geometry, Discerning and representing scales and dimensions of architectural space through manual tools. Skilfully using the sketch as a tool for representation and conception of space. Knowing how to make simple physical three-dimensional models with low cost and easily manipulated materials (paper, balsa, polystyrene, cardboard, plasticine etc.) Students are asked to keep a sketch book and graphic notes from the beginning of the first semester to document his/her introduction to architecture, both through elaborations linked to the contents of the courses of the first semester, both through independent research. The notebook will accompany the student during the atelier, documenting in graphic form the individual path of introduction to the project. The notebook is subject to evaluation during the final exam.
The laboratory is developed through a sequence of 4 exercises that address, individually or transversally, the four proposed thematic axes (space, distribution, structure, techniques), referring to the interpretation of a simple architectural program, focused on to dwelling in its possible variations. The exercises will be mainly individual, even if the organization of the atelier will include discussions and collective reviews, as well as at least one exercise or parts of exercises in groups of 3 or 4 students. The exercises will be carried out mainly through hand drawing, both technical and freehand, and the realization of study models. The start of the exercises will take place in the classroom, under the direction of the teachers, and it will be followed by a subsequent autonomous development by the student outside the laboratory hours, and then concluded by a check and discussion with the teacher, on a weekly basis. Therefore consistent attendance of the laboratory is strongly recommended. The teachers will present and discuss with the students examples of significant architectures, as a whole or for specific aspects; students are required to have an independent and constant attendance of on-line and paper architecture magazines, searching for references for the different themes proposed. It is also recommended to participate in extra-curricular cultural activities organized by the College of Architecture, and to external cultural activities that can be reported by the teachers. Each of the four exercises will last approximately three weeks. The last two weeks are dedicated to the reworking of what was done, in a final presentation (graphic tables and physical model). Coordination and exchange with the architecture design and survey laboratory can be activated both at the first and in the second semester, through joint lectures and periodic checks on the progress of the courses. Possible common exercises in collaboration with the Culture and foundations of architectural technology course and/or with the Morphology and conception of structures course will be communicated at the beginning of the 2nd teaching period, together with the related organizational methods and times.
The laboratory is developed through a sequence of 4 exercises that address, individually or transversally, the four proposed thematic axes (space, distribution, structure, techniques), referring to the interpretation of a simple architectural program, focused on to dwelling in its possible variations. The exercises will be mainly individual, even if the organization of the atelier will include discussions and collective reviews, as well as at least one exercise or parts of exercises in groups of 3 or 4 students. The exercises will be carried out mainly through hand drawing, both technical and freehand, and the realization of study models. The start of the exercises will take place in the classroom, under the direction of the teachers, and it will be followed by a subsequent autonomous development by the student outside the laboratory hours, and then concluded by a check and discussion with the teacher, on a weekly basis. Therefore consistent attendance of the laboratory is strongly recommended. The teachers will present and discuss with the students examples of significant architectures, as a whole or for specific aspects; students are required to have an independent and constant attendance of on-line and paper architecture magazines, searching for references for the different themes proposed. It is also recommended to participate in extra-curricular cultural activities organized by the College of Architecture, and to external cultural activities that can be reported by the teachers. Each of the four exercises will last approximately three weeks. The last two weeks are dedicated to the reworking of what was done, in a final presentation (graphic tables and physical model). Coordination and exchange with the architecture design and survey laboratory can be activated both at the first and in the second semester, through joint lectures and periodic checks on the progress of the courses. Possible common exercises in collaboration with the Culture and foundations of architectural technology course and/or with the Morphology and conception of structures course will be communicated at the beginning of the 2nd teaching period, together with the related organizational methods and times.
Living and housing, core topic of the Design Studio, will be faced through different points of view and exercises of increasing complexity all related each other and linked to the structure of 4 themes and exercises orienting all the parallel studios. An additional main topic carried on all along the studio will be Observation, conceived as an essential skill to develop along an architect's education. To observation will be dedicated specific weekly exercises to form a thematic section of the personal notebook specifically linked to the progressing of the Studio. Living and the spaces for living will be explored in terms of features, scale, functions and distributions as well as sensory elements and hospitality features of places, through a constant debate, commenting and comparing in class the outcomes of the different exercises among them and with selected case studies. Hand working (sketching, drawing, collage and model making) will be the basic tool to transfer the thinking and understanding process to physical objects, easy to handle, to see from different angles, to compare and understand in their materiality. The correct use of words, naming spaces and architectural elements, to be able to describe and understand what the students are proposing and presenting will be another essential part of the educational process. The students, gathered in small groups, will also be asked to comment some of their colleagues' works as a way to understand different proposal and to learn how to describe and synthetically comment them. The exercises will start with the study, comparison and definition of elementary spaces through sketches and models (Exercise 1, individual). The students will consequently enrich a chosen space as a living unit for a specific purpose, presenting and discussing possible alternatives referring to given examples of case studies (Exercise 2, individual). The following step will be the combining of more units defining structural elements together with the Structure teacher, taking also care of an existing given context (Exercise 3, multiple solutions, group of 2/3). The final work will be the final composition of a house, with the definition of materials and details together with the Technology teacher, developing the project defined in Ex3 relating it to its site and context (Exercise 4, multiple solutions, group of 2/3).
Living and housing, core topic of the Design Studio, will be faced through different points of view and exercises of increasing complexity all related each other and linked to the structure of 4 themes and exercises orienting all the parallel studios. An additional main topic carried on all along the studio will be Observation, conceived as an essential skill to develop along an architect's education. To observation will be dedicated specific weekly exercises to form a thematic section of the personal notebook specifically linked to the progressing of the Studio. Living and the spaces for living will be explored in terms of features, scale, functions and distributions as well as sensory elements and hospitality features of places, through a constant debate, commenting and comparing in class the outcomes of the different exercises among them and with selected case studies. Hand working (sketching, drawing, collage and model making) will be the basic tool to transfer the thinking and understanding process to physical objects, easy to handle, to see from different angles, to compare and understand in their materiality. The correct use of words, naming spaces and architectural elements, to be able to describe and understand what the students are proposing and presenting will be another essential part of the educational process. The students, gathered in small groups, will also be asked to comment some of their colleagues' works as a way to understand different proposal and to learn how to describe and synthetically comment them. The exercises will start with the study, comparison and definition of elementary spaces through sketches and models (Exercise 1, individual). The students will consequently enrich a chosen space as a living unit for a specific purpose, presenting and discussing possible alternatives referring to given examples of case studies (Exercise 2, individual). The following step will be the combining of more units defining structural elements together with the Structure teacher, taking also care of an existing given context (Exercise 3, multiple solutions, group of 2/3). The final work will be the final composition of a house, with the definition of materials and details together with the Technology teacher, developing the project defined in Ex3 relating it to its site and context (Exercise 4, multiple solutions, group of 2/3).
On a multi-sensory approach on architecture J.Pallasmaa, The Thinking Hand. Existential and Embodied Wisdom in Architecture, John Wiley and Sons, Chichester 2009 L.Barello, F.Chessa, Ospitalithouse, Triennale di Milano 2018 On drawing rules F.Cellini, Manualetto. Norme tecniche, costruttive e grafiche per lo svolgimento di una esercitazione progettuale sul tema della casa unifamiliare, Cluva-Cittą Studi, Venezia-Milano 1991 On dealing with spaces and places P.Von Meiss, Elements of Architecture: From Form to Place, Taylor & Francis, 1990 H.Hertzberger, Lessons for Students in Architecture, 010 Publishers, Rotterdam 1991 A.Forty, Words and Building. A Vocabulary of Modern Architecture, Thames and Hudson, London 2004 Specific references and an additional bibliography of books and review articles will be given during the Studio.
On a multi-sensory approach on architecture J.Pallasmaa, The Thinking Hand. Existential and Embodied Wisdom in Architecture, John Wiley and Sons, Chichester 2009 L.Barello, F.Chessa, Ospitalithouse, Triennale di Milano 2018 On drawing rules F.Cellini, Manualetto. Norme tecniche, costruttive e grafiche per lo svolgimento di una esercitazione progettuale sul tema della casa unifamiliare, Cluva-Cittą Studi, Venezia-Milano 1991 On dealing with spaces and places P.Von Meiss, Elements of Architecture: From Form to Place, Taylor & Francis, 1990 H.Hertzberger, Lessons for Students in Architecture, 010 Publishers, Rotterdam 1991 A.Forty, Words and Building. A Vocabulary of Modern Architecture, Thames and Hudson, London 2004 Specific references and an additional bibliography of books and review articles will be given during the Studio.
Modalitą di esame: elaborato grafico individuale; elaborato grafico prodotto in gruppo; progetto individuale; progetto di gruppo;
The student receives a continuous feedback from the teacher on his progress through individual and group reviews. A joint collective review of the 6 + 1 laboratories is planned, indicatively placed at the middle of the second semester, and a final exhibition of the projects, with a joint critical discussion in the presence of invited expert guests. The exam takes place through a brief discussion of the individual project path, supported by the exhibition of the different intermediate materials produced by the student during the semester. The evaluation will take into account the following aspects, assessed on the basis of the final and intermediate group and individual products, weighed in the final evaluation as follows: · Ability to interpret and propose spatial configurations, 20% · Ability to interpret and propose distribution configurations, 20% · Ability to interpret and propose structural forms, 20% · Ability to interpret and propose constructive systems, 20% · Quality of representation and communication 20%
Exam: individual graphic design project; group graphic design project; individual project; group project;
The student receives a continuous feedback from the teacher on his progress through individual and group reviews. A joint collective review of the 6 + 1 laboratories is planned, indicatively placed at the middle of the second semester, and a final exhibition of the projects, with a joint critical discussion in the presence of invited expert guests. The exam takes place through a brief discussion of the individual project path, supported by the exhibition of the different intermediate materials produced by the student during the semester. The evaluation will take into account the following aspects, assessed on the basis of the final and intermediate group and individual products, weighed in the final evaluation as follows: · Ability to interpret and propose spatial configurations, 20% · Ability to interpret and propose distribution configurations, 20% · Ability to interpret and propose structural forms, 20% · Ability to interpret and propose constructive systems, 20% · Quality of representation and communication 20%


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