Servizi per la didattica
PORTALE DELLA DIDATTICA

Science and technology studies

01SUMPM, 01SUMJM, 01SUMLH, 01SUMLI, 01SUMLM, 01SUMLN, 01SUMLP, 01SUMLS, 01SUMLU, 01SUMMA, 01SUMMB, 01SUMMC, 01SUMMH, 01SUMMK, 01SUMMN, 01SUMMO, 01SUMNX, 01SUMOA, 01SUMOD, 01SUMPC, 01SUMPI, 01SUMPL, 01SUMPN

A.A. 2021/22

Course Language

Inglese

Course degree

1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Architettura - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Meccanica (Mechanical Engineering) - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Design E Comunicazione - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Dell'Autoveicolo (Automotive Engineering) - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Informatica (Computer Engineering) - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Dell'Autoveicolo - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Electronic And Communications Engineering (Ingegneria Elettronica E Delle Comunicazioni) - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Dei Materiali - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Architettura (Architecture) - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Biomedica - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Chimica E Alimentare - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Civile - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Edile - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Energetica - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Meccanica - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Per L'Ambiente E Il Territorio - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Elettronica - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Informatica - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Fisica - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Del Cinema E Dei Mezzi Di Comunicazione - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Gestionale - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Gestionale - Torino
1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Design E Comunicazione Visiva - Torino

Course structure
Teaching Hours
Lezioni 40
Esercitazioni in aula 20
Teachers
Teacher Status SSD h.Les h.Ex h.Lab h.Tut Years teaching
Mattozzi Alvise   Ricercatore a tempo det. L.240/10 art.24-B SPS/08 40 0 0 0 5
Teaching assistant
Espandi

Context
SSD CFU Activities Area context
SPS/08 6 D - A scelta dello studente A scelta dello studente
2021/22
How can a technical object modify the way in which we interact? How do our relations change with the introduction of new technologies? Can our everyday routine prevent the diffusion of new products? What is the social impact of major infrastructural projects? Do working practices influence the way a design project is conceived and carried out? If we think about common innovations such as the substitution of the moka with coffee-capsules machines, the diffusion of the Wii console, the use of Tinder, the diffusion of various system for the separate collection of garbage or the construction of wind farms, those above are questions that we continuously raise. The course in Social Studies of Science and Technology intends to introduce students to approaches and methods enabling to look for answers to these questions in a systematic, rigorous and verifiable ways, so that these answers can be taken into account within the various phases of the design and engineering processes. The course aims at providing students with competences enabling to take into account, describe, compare and discuss the ways in which projects to which they contribute can influence social relations and, on the other hand, how social relations, through which any design or engineering project unfold, can influence a project. The course consists then in an introduction to Social Studies of Science and Technology or, more shortly, Science and Technology Studies (STS) focused on design – broadly intended – and on those methodological tools, coming from social sciences, which can be integrated within the project, in order to take into account the social complexity of what is designed. Two will be the inquiry methods on which the course will focus: ethnography and controversy mapping. The ethnographic method consists in the direct observation of people’s behaviors within their lifeworld. It will be tackled as ethnography of designing processes, as well as ethnography of the life of artifacts. Controversy mapping will be tackled as a tool in order to highlight the negotiating character of technological innovation and to describe specific situation where such negotiations took place. Topics tackled along the course will be: the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT); artifacts’ capacity to act and produce effects and the ways in which all that can be described thanks to the concepts of script and de-scription; the Theory of Social Practices; the role of users; the biography of artifacts and the domestication process they go through (Domestication Theory); the shared management of innovation processes; the tracking, analysis and mapping of design controversies; the politics of technology; innovation and the related social processes. The course will tackle such topics mainly through case studies – some introduced and discussed in class, other deepened through home reading of articles – and through home and class assignments, such as: comparison and schematization of articles; short descriptions of technical objects’ use through ethnographic observations; description of the social relations inscribed in technical objects; mapping of design controversies.
How can a technical object modify the way in which we interact? How do our relations change with the introduction of new technologies? Can our everyday routine prevent the diffusion of new products? What is the social impact of major infrastructural projects? Do working practices influence the way a design project is conceived and carried out? If we think about common innovations such as the substitution of the moka with coffee-capsules machines, the diffusion of the Wii console, the use of Tinder, the diffusion of various system for the separate collection of garbage or the construction of wind farms, those above are questions that we continuously raise. The course in Social Studies of Science and Technology intends to introduce students to approaches and methods enabling to look for answers to these questions in a systematic, rigorous and verifiable ways, so that these answers can be taken into account within the various phases of the design and engineering processes. The course aims at providing students with competences enabling them to take into account, describe, compare and discuss the ways in which projects to which they contribute can influence social relations and, on the other hand, how social relations, through which any design or engineering project unfolds, can influence a project. The course consists then in an introduction to Social Studies of Science and Technology or, more shortly, Science and Technology Studies (STS) focused on design – broadly intended – and on those methodological tools, coming from social sciences, which can be integrated within engineering, architectural, product or communication design projects, in order to take into account the social complexity of what is designed. Two will be the inquiry methods on which the course will focus: ethnography and controversy mapping. The ethnographic method consists in the direct observation of people’s behaviors within their lifeworld. It will be tackled as ethnography of designing processes, as well as ethnography of the life of artifacts. Controversy mapping will be tackled as a tool in order to highlight the negotiating character of technological innovation and to describe specific situation where such negotiations took place. Topics tackled along the course will be: the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT); artifacts’ capacity to act and produce effects and the ways in which all that can be described thanks to the concepts of script and de-scription; the Theory of Social Practices; the role of users; the biography of artifacts and the domestication process they go through (Domestication Theory); the shared management of innovation processes; the tracking, analysis and mapping of design controversies; the politics of technology; innovation and the related social processes. The course will tackle such topics mainly through case studies – some introduced and discussed in class, other deepened through readings – and through home and class assignments, such as: comparison and schematization of articles; short descriptions of technical objects’ use through ethnographic observations; description of the social relations inscribed in technical objects; mapping of design controversies.
Students will be familiarized with notions, categories and models coming form the Social Studies of Science and Technology and with social research methods. Such familiarization does not aim to make students appropriate these notions, categories, models and methods in order to use them effectively, but in order to be able to consider them within design processes – also through the reading of scientific and specialist literature – and in order to be able to dialogue with social researcher embedded or not into the design processes.
At the end of the course students will be: - familiar with with notions, categories and models coming form the Social Studies of Science and Technology and with social research methods. Therefore, at the end of the course they will be able to - look at situations that are considered mere "technical" as "socio-technical", identifying the various relations an architectural, engineering, product or communication design project take part to; - dialogue with social scientists in relation to the projects they take part in; - find and read social sciences articles related the projects they take part in; - reflect on their social role as architect, engineers or designers
The participation to the course does not require a specific propaedeutic preparation. However, the addressed topics and the required assignments presuppose a good disposition to reading, to observation and to self-observation, together with a minimal knowledge related to text editing and to the (passive) knowledge of English for some readings, as well as to a basic knowledge of computers and their main applications.
The participation to the course does not require a specific propaedeutic preparation. However, a good knowledge of English is advisable. Moreover, the addressed topics and the required assignments presuppose a good disposition to reading and to observation, together with a minimal knowledge related to text editing..
1. The relation society-technology (9) The first part of the course intends first of all to introduce various approaches to the theorization and analysis of the relations between technology and society. From there the first part will focus on STS approaches, especially the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and the Theory of Social Practice. 2. Ethnography: from faraway villages to labs to design studios (15) The second part of the course intends to introduce ethnography as preferred method for the acquisition of knowledge within STS, first of all presenting ethnography in general, as method derived from anthropology, then showing the relevance that it has had for the development of STS and finally showing the way ethnography has been used within the study of design processes. 3. Ethnography of artifacts, script and their description (20) The third part of the course will focus on artifacts – especially technical objects –, the way in which they act and take part to social relations and the methods used to describe these processes. Besides analyzing, through the concept of script, what technical objects make do to their users and how their configuration predispose certain social relations and prevents other ones, approaches to the biographies of objects, such as the Domestication Theory will be introduced. Domestication Theory allows understanding what happens to artifacts once they arrive into users’ households. 4. Design controversy mapping (10) The fourth part of the course intends to introduce the issue of controversies and of their mappings, also through references to digital tools used to do such mapping as, among others, IssueCrawler and CorText. 5. Rethinking Innovation (6) On the ground of the previous sections, in this latter one a reflection on the ways in which to think, describe and design innovation will be introduced.
1. The relation society-technology (9) The first part of the course intends first of all to introduce various approaches to the theorization and analysis of the relations between technology and society. From there the first part will focus on STS approaches, especially the Social Construction of Technology (SCOT) and Actor-Network Theory (ANT) and the Theory of Social Practice. 2. Ethnography: from faraway villages to labs to design studios (15) The second part of the course intends to introduce ethnography as preferred method for the acquisition of knowledge within STS, first of all presenting ethnography in general, as method derived from anthropology, then showing the relevance that it has had for the development of STS and finally showing the way ethnography has been used within the study of design processes. 3. Ethnography of artifacts, script and their description (20) The third part of the course will focus on artifacts – especially technical objects –, the way in which they act and take part to social relations and the methods used to describe these processes. Besides analyzing, through the concept of script, what technical objects make do to their users and how their configuration predispose certain social relations and prevents other ones, approaches to the biographies of objects, such as the Domestication Theory will be introduced. Domestication Theory allows understanding what happens to artifacts once they arrive into users’ households. 4. Design controversy mapping (10) The fourth part of the course intends to introduce the issue of controversies and of their mappings, also through references to digital tools used to do such mapping as, among others, IssueCrawler and CorText. 5. Rethinking Innovation (6) On the ground of the previous sections, in this latter one a reflection on the ways in which to think, describe and design innovation will be introduced.
It is possible to do the exam as attending or non-attending. In order to be considered attending, students need to carry out the required home assignments complying with the planned deadlines. Although attending and non-attending students will learn the same set of notions and will reach the same expected outcomes, the bibliography is different.
It is possible to do the exam as attending or non-attending. In order to be considered attending, students need to carry out the required home assignments complying with the planned deadlines. Although attending and non-attending students will learn the same set of notions and will reach the same expected outcomes, the bibliography is different.
The course entails home and class assignments, such: comparison and schematization of articles; short descriptions of technical objects’ use through ethnographic observations; descriptions of the social relations inscribed in technical objects; mapping of design controversies also through the use of digital applications such as IssueCrawler, CorText, etc.
For attending students: the course entails home and class assignments, such as: reading comprehension quizzes, comparison and schematization of articles; short descriptions of technical objects’ use through ethnographic observations; descriptions of the social relations inscribed in technical objects; mapping of design controversies also through the use of digital applications such as IssueCrawler, CorText, etc. Attending students need to carry out the required home assignments complying with the planned deadlines. For non-attending students: students will manage a bibliography on which will be tested at the exam.
The publications that will be used and the bibliography considered will be integrated along the course. Nevertheless, it is possible to provide a preliminary list of references - Bijker, W., Of Bicycles, Bakelites, and Bulbs: Toward a Theory of Sociotechnical Change, the Mit Press, 1995. - Latour B., Science in Action, Harvard University Press, 1987. - Mattozzi A. (a cura), Il senso degli oggetti tecnici, Meltemi, 2017 - Yaneva A., Mapping Controversies in Architecture, Ashgate, 2009 or, alternatively, Lorenzet A., Il lato controverso della tecnoscienza. Nanotecnologie, biotecnologie e grandi opere nella sfera pubblica, Il Mulino, 2013.
For attending students: readings will be communicated and provided at the begininning of the course. Attending students can in any case consider as reference textbook the following two: - M. Cozza, Key Concepts in Science and Technology Studies, Studentlitteratur, 2020. - S. Sismondo, An Introduction to Science and Technology Studies, Wiley, 2009. For non attending students - S. Sismondo, An Introduction to Science and Technology Studies, Wiley, 2009 - A. Yaneva, Mapping Controversies in Architecture, Ashgate, 2009. and one at choice among: - I. Farias and A. Wilkie (eds.), Studio Studies, Routledge, 2016. - D. Vinck (ed.), Everyday Engineering. The MIT Press, 2009. - A. Yaneva, The Making of a Building, Peter Lang 2009.
Modalità di esame: Prova scritta (in aula); Prova orale obbligatoria;
Exam: Written test; Compulsory oral exam;
Gli studenti e le studentesse con disabilità o con Disturbi Specifici di Apprendimento (DSA), oltre alla segnalazione tramite procedura informatizzata, sono invitati a comunicare anche direttamente al/la docente titolare dell'insegnamento, con un preavviso non inferiore ad una settimana dall'avvio della sessione d'esame, gli strumenti compensativi concordati con l'Unità Special Needs, al fine di permettere al/la docente la declinazione più idonea in riferimento alla specifica tipologia di esame.
Exam: Written test; Compulsory oral exam;
For attending students: the assessment will take place in part during the course, through home assignments, and then at the end of the course, through an oral presentation of a student research. For non-attending students: the assessment will take place through a multiple choice quiz composed by 15 questions, 5 for each one of the books including in the required bibliography, plus a question requiring a medium lenght (around ten lines) written answer.
In addition to the message sent by the online system, students with disabilities or Specific Learning Disorders (SLD) are invited to directly inform the professor in charge of the course about the special arrangements for the exam that have been agreed with the Special Needs Unit. The professor has to be informed at least one week before the beginning of the examination session in order to provide students with the most suitable arrangements for each specific type of exam.
Modalità di esame: Prova orale obbligatoria; Prova scritta tramite PC con l'utilizzo della piattaforma di ateneo;
Exam: Compulsory oral exam; Computer-based written test using the PoliTo platform;
For attending students: the assessment will take place in part during the course, through home assignments, and then at the end of the course, through an oral presentation of a student research. For non-attending students: the assessment will take place through a multiple choice quiz composed by 15 questions, 5 for each one of the books including in the required bibliography, plus a question requiring a medium lenght (around ten lines) written answer.
Modalità di esame: Prova orale obbligatoria; Prova scritta tramite PC con l'utilizzo della piattaforma di ateneo;
Exam: Compulsory oral exam; Computer-based written test using the PoliTo platform;
For attending students: the assessment will take place in part during the course, through home assignments, and then at the end of the course, through an oral presentation of a student research. For non-attending students: the assessment will take place through a multiple choice quiz composed by 15 questions, 5 for each one of the books including in the required bibliography, plus a question requiring a medium lenght (around ten lines) written answer.
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