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PORTALE DELLA DIDATTICA

Motor vehicle mechanics

02SQLQD, 02SQLNE

A.A. 2021/22

Course Language

Inglese

Course degree

Master of science-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Meccanica (Mechanical Engineering) - Torino
Master of science-level of the Bologna process in Ingegneria Meccanica - Torino

Course structure
Teaching Hours
Lezioni 53
Esercitazioni in aula 27
Tutoraggio 39
Teachers
Teacher Status SSD h.Les h.Ex h.Lab h.Tut Years teaching
Galvagno Enrico   Professore Associato ING-IND/13 53 27 0 0 1
Teaching assistant
Espandi

Context
SSD CFU Activities Area context
ING-IND/13 8 B - Caratterizzanti Ingegneria meccanica
2021/22
The subject is addressed at providing the knowledge and capabilities for mathematical and dynamic modelling of passenger vehicles and main automotive systems.
Automotive industry is a typical career opportunity for graduates in mechanical engineering. Working in this context requires at least a basic comprehension of the motor vehicle mechanics subject. The knowledge of main chassis systems (i.e. suspension, steering, powertrain/transmission and tyre) from one hand and the understanding of vehicle dynamic behaviour during braking, traction, cornering and when travelling on rough roads on the other hand, are the basis for vehicle design and virtual validation, early integration of passive or active chassis systems and experimental assessment of vehicle dynamic performance, just to cite some possible fields of application. In this general framework, the subject is addressed at providing the knowledge and capabilities for modelling passenger car dynamics and for the functional design of automotive systems. Thanks to an extensive use of modelling and simulation, the tutorial part of the course allows the students to apply said knowledge and understanding by letting them put their hands on the fundamentals of the discipline, thus verifying, in a virtual but realistic environment, the theoretical aspects explained during the lectures. Different methods and rules of thumb for fast evaluation of alternative design solutions on vehicle dynamic performance will be given during the course for building lifelong skills and foster critical thinking and creativity.
Knowledge related to the dynamic behaviour of motor vehicles and of chassis subsystems such as suspension, steering and braking devices. Capability of modelling and analysing the behaviour of road vehicles with the analytical and numerical methods and simulation softwares provided during the semester.
Knowledge related to the dynamic behaviour of motor vehicles and of chassis subsystems such as transmission, suspension, steering and braking devices. Capability of modelling and analysing the behaviour of road vehicles with the analytical and numerical methods and simulation software provided during the semester.
Attendance of this module requires fluent spoken and written English as a necessary pre-requisite: all lectures and tutorials, and all study material will be in English. It is assumed that students taking this subject already have knowledge and understanding of analytical and applied mechanics, vibrations, technical drawing, machine design, Matlab software and of fundamental of differential and integral calculus.
Attendance of this module requires fluent spoken and written English as a necessary pre-requisite: all lectures and tutorials, and all study material will be in English. It is assumed that students taking this subject already have knowledge and understanding of analytical and applied mechanics, vibrations, technical drawing, machine design, Matlab software and of fundamental of differential and integral calculus.
• Tyre dynamics: slip and slip angle, longitudinal and side forces, transient behaviour, Pacejka magic formula • Longitudinal dynamics - driving: power required for motion, maximum slope, acceleration and speed. Transmissions for ICE: manual and non-manual transmissions (AMT, DCT, AT). Differentials. • Longitudinal dynamics - braking: ideal and real braking distribution, efficiency, main components of braking systems, ABS. Regenerative braking. • Lateral dynamics: single track model, kinematic and dynamic equations. Vehicle directional behaviour and stability. Analysis of steady state and transient motion. Effects of longitudinal and lateral load transfer. Roll bars. • Suspensions: analysis of main components and architectures. Kinematic gradients and analysis of the influence on lateral dynamics. Roll behaviour. Anti-dive, anti-lift and anti-squat characteristics. • Spring and shock absorber design: driving comfort and drivability. • Hybrid architectures: parallel, series, EVT and dual mode transmissions.
• Tyre dynamics: tire brush model, slip and slip angle, longitudinal and side forces, transient behaviour, Pacejka magic formula • Longitudinal dynamics - driving: power required for motion, maximum slope, acceleration and speed, fuel/energy consumption. Transmissions for ICE: manual and non-manual transmissions (AMT, DCT, AT). Differentials. • Longitudinal dynamics - braking: ideal and real braking distribution, efficiency, main components of braking systems, ABS. Regenerative braking. • Lateral dynamics: single track model, kinematic and dynamic equations. Vehicle handling and stability. Analysis of steady state and transient motion. Effects of longitudinal and lateral load transfer. Roll behaviour and anti-roll bars. • Vertical dynamics: springs and shock absorbers design for ride comfort. • Suspensions: analysis of main components and architectures. Kinematic gradients and analysis of the influence on lateral dynamics. Testing: Kinematic and Compliance (K&C). Anti-dive, anti-lift and anti-squat characteristics. • Hybrid powertrain architectures: parallel, series, EVT and dual mode transmissions.
Credits 8: 80 classroom hours (53 lecture hours, 27 tutorial hours). Theoretical lectures are supported by examples and applications. Tutorials will focus on using and developing software partly provided as course material to analyse vehicle dynamics and main subsystem characteristics. Students are required to apply knowledge to working context problems and to interact with the tutor, especially when setting the solution. The tutor will assist students during the tutorial class hours, supporting students in their learning progression and clarifying their doubts. Attendance to both lectures and tutorials is strongly recommended, being vital to achieve the expected learning outcomes. Neither intermediate formal checks of the learning process nor reports on projects are programmed. The teacher and the tutor are available weekly during the teaching period in order to meet students for explanations; please contact them by e-mail.
Credits 8: 80 classroom hours (53 lecture hours, 27 tutorial hours). Theoretical lectures are supported by examples and applications. Tutorials will focus on using and developing software partly provided as course material to analyse vehicle dynamics and main subsystem characteristics. Students are required to apply knowledge to working context problems and to interact with the tutor, especially when setting the solution. The tutor will assist students during the tutorial class hours, supporting students in their learning progression and clarifying their doubts. Attendance to both lectures and tutorials is strongly recommended, being vital to achieve the expected learning outcomes. Neither intermediate formal checks of the learning process nor reports on projects are programmed. The teacher and the tutor are available weekly during the teaching period in order to meet students for explanations; please contact them by e-mail.
• M. Guiggiani, "The Science of Vehicle Dynamics", Springer, 2016. • H.B. Pacejika, "Tire and Vehicle Dynamics", Butterworth-Heinemann, 2012. • G. Genta, L. Morello, "The automotive Chassis", Volume 1 and 2, Springer, 2009. Lectures notes on specific topics and other material are available on the course page. Tutorials: texts of problems and Matlab/Simulink codes are provided on the website before the tutorials. Students should either download or print the files.
• M. Guiggiani, "The Science of Vehicle Dynamics", Springer, 2016. • H.B. Pacejika, "Tire and Vehicle Dynamics", Butterworth-Heinemann, 2012. • G. Genta, L. Morello, "The automotive Chassis", Volume 1 and 2, Springer, 2009. Lectures notes on specific topics and other material are available on the course page. Tutorials: texts of problems and Matlab/Simulink codes are provided on the website before the tutorials. Students should either download or print the files.
Modalità di esame: Prova scritta (in aula); Prova orale facoltativa;
Assessment Achieved learning outcomes will be assessed by means of a final exam, consisting of a written test and of an optional oral part. The exam is based on an analytical assessment of student achievement of the "expected learning outcomes" described above. In order to properly assess such achievement, the examination consists of a written test, lasting indicatively 1 h 30 min, closed book, composed of three questions, each focused on one of the topics seen during the lectures. The exam aims at evaluating the ability of the students to deal with the dynamic behaviour of vehicle systems, starting from the model definition and ending with the system analysis. In particular, the test aims at assessing knowledge, communication skills and ability to use tools and method taught in the lectures for analysing and modelling components, subsystems and vehicle longitudinal and lateral dynamics. The optional oral part aims at assessing the knowledge of the software used during the tutorials, discussing both the model structure and the results from the simulations. Moreover also the student ability to explain the effects of parameter variations on the results will be assessed. Grading criteria The final maximum obtainable mark is 30/30 with merit (cum laude) and is formed by the sum of the mark achieved in the written test (0 ÷ 28) plus the mark of the optional oral test (-3 ÷ +5). The oral part can be taken only if the mark of the written part is at least 18. Each answer to the three questions usually is evaluated from 0 to a maximum of 9 or 10 points, for a total of 28 available points. The oral consists in a discussion and can also lead to loss of points: the oral score can vary from -3 up to +5 points. A few days after the written test, students are summoned for a review of the written output, in which examiners inform the student on grading criteria, and receive any student appeal supported by appropriate explanations. In the same day, students who chose to take the oral part will be examined. During the semester, students are given an example of the final test, with discussion of the solution and hints on common errors and evaluation criteria. Computers, mobiles, electronic devices and any printed documentation are not allowed.
Exam: Written test; Optional oral exam;
Assessment Achieved learning outcomes will be assessed by means of a final exam, consisting of a written test and of an optional oral part. The exam is based on an analytical assessment of student achievement of the "expected learning outcomes" described above. In order to properly assess such achievement, the examination consists of a written test, lasting indicatively 2 h , closed book, composed of three questions, each focused on one of the topics seen during the lectures. The exam aims at evaluating the ability of the students to deal with the dynamic behaviour of vehicle systems, starting from the model definition and ending with the system analysis. In particular, the test aims at assessing knowledge, communication skills and ability to use tools and method taught in the lectures for analysing and modelling components, subsystems and vehicle longitudinal, lateral and vertical dynamics. The optional oral part aims at assessing the knowledge of the software used during the tutorials, discussing both the model structure and the results from the simulations. Moreover also the student ability to explain the effects of parameter variations on the results will be assessed. Grading criteria The final maximum obtainable mark is 30/30 with merit (cum laude) and is formed by the sum of the mark achieved in the written test (0 ÷ 28) plus the mark of the optional oral test (-3 ÷ +5). The oral part can be taken only if the mark of the written part is at least 18. Each answer to the three questions usually is evaluated from 0 to a maximum of 9 or 10 points, for a total of 28 available points. The oral consists in a discussion and can also lead to loss of points: the oral score can vary from -3 up to +5 points. A few days after the written test, students are summoned for a review of the written output, in which examiners inform the student on grading criteria, and receive any student appeal supported by appropriate explanations. In the same day, students who chose to take the oral part will be examined. During the semester, students are given an example of the final test, with discussion of the solution and hints on common errors and evaluation criteria. Computers, mobiles, electronic devices and any printed documentation are not allowed.
Modalità di esame: Prova orale facoltativa; Prova scritta a risposta aperta o chiusa tramite PC con l'utilizzo della piattaforma di ateneo Exam integrata con strumenti di proctoring (Respondus);
Assessment Achieved learning outcomes will be assessed by means of a final exam, consisting of a written test and of an optional oral part. The exam is based on an analytical assessment of student achievement of the "expected learning outcomes" described above. In order to properly assess such achievement, the examination consists of a written test, lasting indicatively 1 h 30 min, closed book, composed of three questions, each focused on one of the topics seen during the lectures. The exam aims at evaluating the ability of the students to deal with the dynamic behaviour of vehicle systems, starting from the model definition and ending with the system analysis. In particular, the test aims at assessing knowledge, communication skills and ability to use tools and method taught in the lectures for analysing and modelling components, subsystems and vehicle longitudinal and lateral dynamics. The optional oral part aims at assessing the knowledge of the software used during the tutorials, discussing both the model structure and the results from the simulations. Moreover also the student ability to explain the effects of parameter variations on the results will be assessed. Grading criteria The final maximum obtainable mark is 30/30 with merit (cum laude) and is formed by the sum of the mark achieved in the written test (0 ÷ 28) plus the mark of the optional oral test (-3 ÷ +5). The oral part can be taken only if the mark of the written part is at least 18. Each answer to the three questions usually is evaluated from 0 to a maximum of 9 or 10 points, for a total of 28 available points. The oral consists in a discussion and can also lead to loss of points: the oral score can vary from -3 up to +5 points. A few days after the written test, students are summoned for a review of the written output, in which examiners inform the student on grading criteria, and receive any student appeal supported by appropriate explanations. In the same day, students who chose to take the oral part will be examined. During the semester, students are given an example of the final test, with discussion of the solution and hints on common errors and evaluation criteria. Computers, mobiles, electronic devices and any printed documentation are not allowed.
Exam: Optional oral exam; Computer-based written test with open-ended questions or multiple-choice questions using the Exam platform and proctoring tools (Respondus);
Assessment Achieved learning outcomes will be assessed by means of a final exam, consisting of a written test and of an optional oral part. The exam is based on an analytical assessment of student achievement of the "expected learning outcomes" described above. In order to properly assess such achievement, the examination consists of a written test, lasting indicatively 2 h min, closed book, composed of three questions, each focused on one of the topics seen during the lectures. The exam aims at evaluating the ability of the students to deal with the dynamic behaviour of vehicle systems, starting from the model definition and ending with the system analysis. In particular, the test aims at assessing knowledge, communication skills and ability to use tools and method taught in the lectures for analysing and modelling components, subsystems and vehicle longitudinal and lateral dynamics. The optional oral part aims at assessing the knowledge of the software used during the tutorials, discussing both the model structure and the results from the simulations. Moreover also the student ability to explain the effects of parameter variations on the results will be assessed. Grading criteria The final maximum obtainable mark is 30/30 with merit (cum laude) and is formed by the sum of the mark achieved in the written test (0 ÷ 28) plus the mark of the optional oral test (-3 ÷ +5). The oral part can be taken only if the mark of the written part is at least 18. Each answer to the three questions usually is evaluated from 0 to a maximum of 9 or 10 points, for a total of 28 available points. The oral consists in a discussion and can also lead to loss of points: the oral score can vary from -3 up to +5 points. A few days after the written test, students are summoned for a review of the written output, in which examiners inform the student on grading criteria, and receive any student appeal supported by appropriate explanations. In the same day, students who chose to take the oral part will be examined. During the semester, students are given an example of the final test, with discussion of the solution and hints on common errors and evaluation criteria. Computers, mobiles, electronic devices and any printed documentation are not allowed.
Modalità di esame: Prova scritta (in aula); Prova orale facoltativa; Prova scritta a risposta aperta o chiusa tramite PC con l'utilizzo della piattaforma di ateneo Exam integrata con strumenti di proctoring (Respondus);
Assessment Achieved learning outcomes will be assessed by means of a final exam, consisting of a written test and of an optional oral part. The exam is based on an analytical assessment of student achievement of the "expected learning outcomes" described above. In order to properly assess such achievement, the examination consists of a written test, lasting indicatively 1 h 30 min, closed book, composed of three questions, each focused on one of the topics seen during the lectures. The exam aims at evaluating the ability of the students to deal with the dynamic behaviour of vehicle systems, starting from the model definition and ending with the system analysis. In particular, the test aims at assessing knowledge, communication skills and ability to use tools and method taught in the lectures for analysing and modelling components, subsystems and vehicle longitudinal and lateral dynamics. The optional oral part aims at assessing the knowledge of the software used during the tutorials, discussing both the model structure and the results from the simulations. Moreover also the student ability to explain the effects of parameter variations on the results will be assessed. Grading criteria The final maximum obtainable mark is 30/30 with merit (cum laude) and is formed by the sum of the mark achieved in the written test (0 ÷ 28) plus the mark of the optional oral test (-3 ÷ +5). The oral part can be taken only if the mark of the written part is at least 18. Each answer to the three questions usually is evaluated from 0 to a maximum of 9 or 10 points, for a total of 28 available points. The oral consists in a discussion and can also lead to loss of points: the oral score can vary from -3 up to +5 points. A few days after the written test, students are summoned for a review of the written output, in which examiners inform the student on grading criteria, and receive any student appeal supported by appropriate explanations. In the same day, students who chose to take the oral part will be examined. During the semester, students are given an example of the final test, with discussion of the solution and hints on common errors and evaluation criteria. Computers, mobiles, electronic devices and any printed documentation are not allowed.
Exam: Written test; Optional oral exam; Computer-based written test with open-ended questions or multiple-choice questions using the Exam platform and proctoring tools (Respondus);
Assessment Achieved learning outcomes will be assessed by means of a final exam, consisting of a written test and of an optional oral part. The exam is based on an analytical assessment of student achievement of the "expected learning outcomes" described above. In order to properly assess such achievement, the examination consists of a written test, lasting indicatively 2 h, closed book, composed of three questions, each focused on one of the topics seen during the lectures. The exam aims at evaluating the ability of the students to deal with the dynamic behaviour of vehicle systems, starting from the model definition and ending with the system analysis. In particular, the test aims at assessing knowledge, communication skills and ability to use tools and method taught in the lectures for analysing and modelling components, subsystems and vehicle longitudinal and lateral dynamics. The optional oral part aims at assessing the knowledge of the software used during the tutorials, discussing both the model structure and the results from the simulations. Moreover also the student ability to explain the effects of parameter variations on the results will be assessed. Grading criteria The final maximum obtainable mark is 30/30 with merit (cum laude) and is formed by the sum of the mark achieved in the written test (0 ÷ 28) plus the mark of the optional oral test (-3 ÷ +5). The oral part can be taken only if the mark of the written part is at least 18. Each answer to the three questions usually is evaluated from 0 to a maximum of 9 or 10 points, for a total of 28 available points. The oral consists in a discussion and can also lead to loss of points: the oral score can vary from -3 up to +5 points. A few days after the written test, students are summoned for a review of the written output, in which examiners inform the student on grading criteria, and receive any student appeal supported by appropriate explanations. In the same day, students who chose to take the oral part will be examined. During the semester, students are given an example of the final test, with discussion of the solution and hints on common errors and evaluation criteria. Computers, mobiles, electronic devices and any printed documentation are not allowed.
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