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Urban planning

03OUDLU

A.A. 2019/20

Course Language

Inglese

Course degree

1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process in Architecture - Torino

Course structure
Teaching Hours
Lezioni 64
Esercitazioni in aula 16
Teachers
Teacher Status SSD h.Les h.Ex h.Lab h.Tut Years teaching
Tiepolo Maurizio Professore Associato ICAR/20 64 16 0 0 10
Teaching assistant
Espandi

Context
SSD CFU Activities Area context
ICAR/21 8 B - Caratterizzanti Progettazione urbanistica e pianificazione territoriale
2019/20
Learning objective of "Urban Planning" is to introduce Students: • the various forms of human settlements and their transformations in the course of time; • the demographic, economic and climatic drivers of these changes, according to the different theories of interpretation; • the most common categories of urban plans, implementation tools and planning methods.
Learning objective of "Urban Planning" is to introduce Students: • the various forms of human settlements and their transformations in the course of time; • the demographic, economic and climatic drivers of these changes, according to the different theories of interpretation; • the most common categories of urban plans, implementation tools and planning methods.
At the end of the Course Students are expected: 1. mastering the urban planning terms, having knowledge of the contents and organization of main local plans, being able to appreciate their quality; 2. to understand and identify key concept expressed in the different technical languages by key readings accompanying each Course’s lecture; 3. to characterize the main dynamics in human settlements (land use, population density, commuting, real estate), and inequalities using appropriate sources and methods; 4. to identify the main drivers of urban transformations (e.g.: structure and population dynamics, employment, residential market, hydro-climatic disasters); 5. draft and present a conceptual site plan in accordance with development code (land use, size and arrangement of the building envelopes, place and size of community services, safe urban road system) and within conventional planning tools.
At the end of the Course Students are expected: 1. mastering the urban planning terms, having knowledge of the contents and organization of main local plans, being able to appreciate their quality; 2. to understand and identify key concept expressed in the different technical languages by key readings accompanying each Course’s lecture; 3. to characterize the main dynamics in human settlements (land use, population density, commuting, real estate), and inequalities using appropriate sources and methods; 4. to identify the main drivers of urban transformations (e.g.: structure and population dynamics, employment, residential market, hydro-climatic disasters); 5. draft and present a conceptual site plan in accordance with development code (land use, size and arrangement of the building envelopes, place and size of community services, safe urban road system) and within conventional planning tools.
None
None
The Course is organized into three sections. The first section shares knowledge on (i) the various forms of human settlements (cities, metropolitan areas and regions, urban sprawl), (ii) the territorial changes (environment and landscape) and on (iii) the territorial gaps (GDP pc ppp, Income/Gini index, Human development index, Human poverty index, Quality of life). The Italian context is systematically compared with that of EU27 and USA. Specific attention is paid to "transitions" (first metropolitan areas, first urban regions, origins of urban sprawl) that are retraced through contemporary writings and technical reports. The second section introduces some of the main drivers of human settlements changes identified in the first section (demographic transitions, rise of a tertiary sector economy, climate change, etc.). The main interpretative theories of ageing, in-migration, counter urbanization, urban sprawl, property predominance of housing, rise and mutation of industrial districts, adaptation/mitigation to/of climate change are presented and discussed. Technical reports by the United Nations-DESA, UNISDR-International Panel on Climate Change and the European Union provide the basis for this section. The third section introduces to the urban governance: local governments, the "growth machine", most common policies, categories of plans and development code at local scale. The organization of teaching through lectures, oral and written synthesis on the mandatory readings (reports, scientific papers, legislation), identification of the reference lexicon, application of the analysis in selected cases in the contexts of origin of Students, assignments aimed at increasing the capacity of the Student's understanding and abilities. Section A - Phenomena and changes (18 hours) A1 Urban: City, Commuting, Metropolitan areas and regions A2 Rural: Urban sprawl and country side, Environment and landscape, Regional inequalities Section B - Drivers of changes (15 hours) B1 Population: Trends, structure and territorial distribution, Access to housing B2 Climate change: Climate change and disasters, Urban climatology, Climate planning Section C – Changes’ governance (42 hours) C1 Urban planning goals and means: Compact city, Brownfields redevelopment, Transition oriented development C2 Urban plans types and implementing tools: Local development/Comprehensive plan, Land use plan and code, Density and land use, Transfer of development rights, Traffic safety through street design
The Course is organized into three sections. The first section shares knowledge on (i) the various forms of human settlements (cities, metropolitan areas and regions, urban sprawl), (ii) the territorial changes (environment and landscape) and on (iii) the territorial gaps (GDP pc ppp, Income/Gini index, Human development index, Human poverty index, Quality of life). The Italian context is systematically compared with that of EU27 and USA. Specific attention is paid to "transitions" (first metropolitan areas, first urban regions, origins of urban sprawl) that are retraced through contemporary writings and technical reports. The second section introduces some of the main drivers of human settlements changes identified in the first section (demographic transitions, rise of a tertiary sector economy, climate change, etc.). The main interpretative theories of ageing, in-migration, counter urbanization, urban sprawl, property predominance of housing, rise and mutation of industrial districts, adaptation/mitigation to/of climate change are presented and discussed. Technical reports by the United Nations-DESA, UNISDR-International Panel on Climate Change and the European Union provide the basis for this section. The third section introduces to the urban governance: local governments, the "growth machine", most common policies, categories of plans and development code at local scale. The organization of teaching through lectures, oral and written synthesis on the mandatory readings (reports, scientific papers, legislation), identification of the reference lexicon, application of the analysis in selected cases in the contexts of origin of Students, assignments aimed at increasing the capacity of the Student's understanding and abilities. Section A - Phenomena and changes (18 hours) A1 Urban: City, Commuting, Metropolitan areas and regions A2 Rural: Urban sprawl and country side, Environment and landscape, Regional inequalities Section B - Drivers of changes (15 hours) B1 Population: Trends, structure and territorial distribution, Access to housing B2 Climate change: Climate change and disasters, Urban climatology, Climate planning Section C – Changes’ governance (42 hours) C1 Urban planning goals and means: Compact city, Brownfields redevelopment, Transition oriented development C2 Urban plans types and implementing tools: Local development/Comprehensive plan, Land use plan and code, Density and land use, Transfer of development rights, Traffic safety through street design
The Course is organized into 16 Lectures, 3 Assignments to be developed by teams of 2 Students, 3 Written exam simulations, 1 Seminar. Lectures have been summarized at the previous section. Assignments deal with (i) the assessment of a climate-plan for a medium-size city, (ii) a residential lot development according the development code, (iii) a conceptual site plan Simulations of the final exam (one for each course section), are organized as questionnaires on 2 readings selected by the Students (in class voting) from the bibliography of each course section.
The Course is organized into 16 Lectures, 3 Assignments to be developed by teams of 2 Students, 3 Written exam simulations, 1 Seminar. Lectures have been summarized at the previous section. Assignments deal with (i) the assessment of a climate-plan for a medium-size city, (ii) a residential lot development according the development code, (iii) a conceptual site plan Simulations of the final exam (one for each course section), are organized as questionnaires on 2 readings selected by the Students (in class voting) from the bibliography of each course section.
Barrington- Leigh, C., Millard-Ball, A. 2015. A century of sprawl in the United States. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112 (7): 8244-8249. Cervero, R. 2009. Public transport and sustainabble urbanism: global lessons. In Transit oriented development. Making it happen, ed. Curtis C., J.L. Renne, L. Bertolini, 23-38. Farnham: Ashgate. Metcalf G. 2018. Sand castles before the tide? Affordable housing in expansive cities. Journal of Economic Perspectives 32(1): 59-80 Eurostat. 2016. Patterns of urban and city development. In Urban Europe. Statistics on cities, town and suburbs. 2016 edition, 55-82. Luxembourg: Publication office of the European Union. EC-DGC-European Commission-Directorate General for Communication (2013), Attitudes of Europeans towards urban mobility. Stevenson M., Thompson J., Herick de Sa T. et al 2017. Land-use, transport and population health: Estimating the health benefits of compact cities. Lancet 388(10062): 2925-2935 IPCC-International Panel for Climate Change. 2014. Climate change 2014. Synthesis report. Summary for policy makers. Kim J.H., Houston D. 2016. Infill dynamics in rail transit corridors: Challenges and prospects for integrating transportation and land use planning. Technical report Bouton S., Knupfer S.M. et al. 2015. Urban mobility at a tipping point. Technical report Norton B.A., Coutts A.M., Livesley S.J. et al 2015. Planning for cooler cities: A framework to prioritise green infrastructure to mitigate high temperatures in urban landscapes. Landscape and Urban Planning 134: 127-138 Linkous E.R. 2017. Transfer of development rights and urban land markets, Environment and Planning A 49(5): 1122-1145. Tiepolo, M. 2017. Relevance and quality of climate planning for large and medium-sized cities of the Tropics: In Renewing Local Planning to Face Climate Change in the Tropics, ed. M. Tiepolo, A. Pezzoli and V. Tarchiani, 199-226. Springer. Tiepolo, M. 2019. Tips on housing and safe urban roads design: 11. UNDESA-Department of Economic and Social Affairs. 2017. World population prospects. The 2017 revision. Key findings and advance tables. New York, United Nations.
Barrington- Leigh, C., Millard-Ball, A. 2015. A century of sprawl in the United States. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 112 (7): 8244-8249. Cervero, R. 2009. Public transport and sustainabble urbanism: global lessons. In Transit oriented development. Making it happen, ed. Curtis C., J.L. Renne, L. Bertolini, 23-38. Farnham: Ashgate. Metcalf G. 2018. Sand castles before the tide? Affordable housing in expansive cities. Journal of Economic Perspectives 32(1): 59-80 Eurostat. 2016. Patterns of urban and city development. In Urban Europe. Statistics on cities, town and suburbs. 2016 edition, 55-82. Luxembourg: Publication office of the European Union. EC-DGC-European Commission-Directorate General for Communication (2013), Attitudes of Europeans towards urban mobility. Stevenson M., Thompson J., Herick de Sa T. et al 2017. Land-use, transport and population health: Estimating the health benefits of compact cities. Lancet 388(10062): 2925-2935 IPCC-International Panel for Climate Change. 2014. Climate change 2014. Synthesis report. Summary for policy makers. Kim J.H., Houston D. 2016. Infill dynamics in rail transit corridors: Challenges and prospects for integrating transportation and land use planning. Technical report Bouton S., Knupfer S.M. et al. 2015. Urban mobility at a tipping point. Technical report Norton B.A., Coutts A.M., Livesley S.J. et al 2015. Planning for cooler cities: A framework to prioritise green infrastructure to mitigate high temperatures in urban landscapes. Landscape and Urban Planning 134: 127-138 Linkous E.R. 2017. Transfer of development rights and urban land markets, Environment and Planning A 49(5): 1122-1145. Tiepolo, M. 2017. Relevance and quality of climate planning for large and medium-sized cities of the Tropics: In Renewing Local Planning to Face Climate Change in the Tropics, ed. M. Tiepolo, A. Pezzoli and V. Tarchiani, 199-226. Springer. Tiepolo, M. 2019. Tips on housing and safe urban roads design: 11. UNDESA-Department of Economic and Social Affairs. 2017. World population prospects. The 2017 revision. Key findings and advance tables. New York, United Nations.
Modalità di esame: Prova scritta (in aula); Elaborato grafico prodotto in gruppo;
Passing Urban Planning requires: A) Passing the final written exam. Written exam is about 6 out of the 13 mandatory readings of the Course. Written exam is aimed to verify Students attended the learning goals (1) and (2). Readings are selected by Students (in class voting) in the number of 2 for each Course section. The exam is organized as follows: 5 questions (open-ended and closed-ended) on each reading. The exam duration is one hour. The use of smart phones or written material is not permitted. Students are required to show their identity through an Id card or Stu card. B) Delivering the Final report (a collection of 6 readings summaries and the 3 assignments). Final report is aimed to verify Students attended the learning goals (3), (4) and (5). C) Presenting in class an assignment. The value of (A), (B), (C) components is: A=0 to 5, B=0 to 6, C= 0 to 1. Students are demanded to pass (A) with at least 18/30 to add the points obtained for B & C determinants.
Exam: Written test; Group graphic design project;
Passing Urban Planning requires: A) Passing the final written exam. Written exam is about 6 out of the 13 mandatory readings of the Course. Written exam is aimed to verify Students attended the learning goals (1) and (2). Readings are selected by Students (in class voting) in the number of 2 for each Course section. The exam is organized as follows: 5 questions (open-ended and closed-ended) on each reading. The exam duration is one hour. The use of smart phones or written material is not permitted. Students are required to show their identity through an Id card or Stu card. B) Delivering the Final report (a collection of 6 readings summaries and the 3 assignments). Final report is aimed to verify Students attended the learning goals (3), (4) and (5). C) Presenting in class an assignment. The value of (A), (B), (C) components is: A=0 to 5, B=0 to 6, C= 0 to 1. Students are demanded to pass (A) with at least 18/30 to add the points obtained for B & C determinants.


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