PORTALE DELLA DIDATTICA
1
ENGINEERING
Course outline
 
Course description
 
Programme syllabus
 
Guide for Students
 
Degree Programme Regulation
 
Department
 
Collegio
 
Results of assessment questionnaires (C.P.D.)
 
Level of satisfaction of graduating students (AlmaLaurea)
 
Employment condition (AlmaLaurea)
 
Admission requirements
 
Final exam
 
SERVICES TO STUDENTS
Services
 
Tuition fees
 
Organization of academic structures
 
Students' representatives
 
Teaching staff
 
Examination sessions
 
ADDITIONAL SERVICES
Decentralized structures to support students (SDSS)
 
Streaming - on-line courses
 
FURTHER INFORMATION
SUA-CdS Information Model
 
Glossary en-it
 
AEROSPACE ENGINEERING, Laurea (1st degree and Bachelor-level of the Bologna process)
Academic Year 2019/20
DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
Collegio di Ingegneria Meccanica, Aerospaziale, dell'Autoveicolo e della Produzione
Campus: TORINO
Program duration: 3 years
Class L-9 Degree: INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Seats available: 369 (5 reserved for non European citizens)
Reference Faculty
PASTRONE DARIO GIUSEPPE   referente.aerospaziale@polito.it
Program held in Italian
The first year is common to other graduate programs and is also offered in English Language
The first year is common to other graduate programs and is also offered in streaming
SDSS service is available
 Educational objectives

The programme is divided into several thematic blocks: - Scientific and methodological foundations Mathematics and basic sciences (physics and chemistry) for engineering. These courses are held in the first three semesters, although the third year programme also provides optional courses in mathematics and statistics for students wishing to strengthen their background. - General engineering Timetabled in the second year, this block provid... More...

The programme is divided into several thematic blocks:
- Scientific and methodological foundations
Mathematics and basic sciences (physics and chemistry) for engineering. These courses are held in the first three semesters, although the third year programme also provides optional courses in mathematics and statistics for students wishing to strengthen their background.
- General engineering
Timetabled in the second year, this block provides the base common to all engineers (industrial and other) and gives them the characteristic "mindset". It focuses on industrial technical design, materials science and technology, machinery mechanics, electrical engineering, electronics, applied thermodynamics, heat transfer and structural mechanics (the last three subjects, while sharing the programme with other industrial engineering students, are treated with greater attention to the connection with subsequent courses in aeronautic construction and aerodynamics).

- Aerospace engineering
This third-year block covers the core of knowledge traditionally pertaining to aerospace engineering, including flight mechanics, aerospace construction and structures, aerospace equipment and systems, fluid dynamics and aerodynamics, and aerospace propulsion. These form the basis for the main technical competences of graduates, their ability to keep abreast of new developments during working life, or the pursuit of further studies.

- Aeronautic maintenance
Also provided in the third year are more practical options, aimed at forming a professional figure with directly marketable skills and focused on aircraft maintenance. These training activities are supervised by the Italian Civil Aviation Authority (ENAC), a member of the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA), which guarantees full recognition for the purposes of awarding graduates Aircraft Maintenance Licence Class C, in accordance with EASA Part 66 international norms.

- Context knowledge and final exam
Context knowledge gives students the global vision required by the very nature of aerospace engineering, and opens the way to related issues (economic, regulatory, environmental, humanistic, linguistic) whose weight in the aerospace business is growing. This content is often integrated into other courses and is taught throughout the curriculum; in the first year students study the evolution of aviation (including the current international aerospace scenario), English and computer science, while the second year includes courses in economics, including notions of aviation regulations and industrial security. Within the course offering of the Politecnico students can also choose further studies in economics, life sciences and emerging issues in engineering.
The programme concludes with a final exam based on an assignment carried out independently by the student, who will present his or her dissertation before a reviewing commission. For students who choose the EASA Part66 path the dissertation is associated to an internship in an industry or company. Both the dissertation and the presentation must be in line with current standards of technical communication.
Before graduating students must also attain English language certification at the level of the Cambridge Preliminary English Test, "Pass with Merit".

 Career opportunities

The BSc degree programme in Aerospace Engineering aims to form a professional figure who, though historically part of the industrial engineering sector, is today open to wider fields and especially all the disciplines that contribute to the design, production and management of aerospace products. Modern aerospace engineering is to all effects a type of system engineering, and increasingly has to integrate all the elements that come together in th... More...

The BSc degree programme in Aerospace Engineering aims to form a professional figure who, though historically part of the industrial engineering sector, is today open to wider fields and especially all the disciplines that contribute to the design, production and management of aerospace products. Modern aerospace engineering is to all effects a type of system engineering, and increasingly has to integrate all the elements that come together in the design or management of an aircraft or spacecraft. The knowledge base of the aerospace engineer is not specialised, even though it integrates many and varied kinds of expertise. The final goal of creating an aeronautic or space product, far from narrowing the scope of training required, expands it; even when engaged in a specialist context, aerospace engineers must be able to form a global picture of the various aspects of a problem, to assemble knowledge from disciplinary domains that are often far apart, and apply it in the general context in which the product is designed, built and used.
To achieve this, the BSc programme in Aerospace Engineering builds on a broad interdisciplinary base that sometimes digresses from the narrow industrial engineering field (including for example electronics, whose role in aerospace is now indisputable), engaging a variety of disciplines that include both those typical of the aviation industry (and to a lesser extent the space industry, which is covered more thoroughly during the MSc programme) and those that enable a systems engineer to establish a dialogue with experts in contiguous areas.
The programme allows graduates to go directly into employment; the field of aircraft maintenance has been identified as particularly accessible to the BSc-level aerospace engineer and to this end specific options are offered within the course of studies. More generally, however, the training produces a professional who is aware of all aspects, not only technical, involved in aerospace activities and therefore applicable in wider contexts. Even without the in-depth knowledge provided in the MSc courses, Bachelor-level aerospace engineers have all the cognitive tools needed to continuously update their knowledge, to participate actively in the process of technological innovation, or to continue their studies if they so decide.
Employment opportunities for which graduates in Aerospace Engineering are specifically trained lie mainly in the aerospace field itself:

- Major aerospace industries of both national and European dimensions;
- Small and medium-size industries which supply the former;
- Agencies and contractors responsible for aircraft maintenance;
- Airline companies;
- Air traffic management authorities;
- The air force and other military aviation sectors;
- Public and private bodies for testing in the aerospace field.
In addition, the multidisciplinary awareness of the aerospace engineer and some of his or her specific competences (fluid dynamics and aerodynamics, thin structures, attention to weight and material savings in design, familiarity with advanced materials and technologies, ability to envision whole systems, sensitivity to safety issues) can readily be applied in a range of jobs outside the aerospace sector where product and process innovation play a dominant role. European-level data show that about 50% of aerospace engineers are offered employment outside the aerospace industry, even in regions where aerospace activities are most strongly established and offer the greatest employment opportunities.

The Study program qualifies the following professional profile/s: Roles and skills:
Maintenance Engineer
The maintenance engineer is particularly well fitted to the professional practice, particularly in the industrial domains related to the services and the support to the customers. 
Functions in a working environment
The maintenance and technical support engineers are typically required to coordinate the management and checking/supervision of aeronautical maintenance on fixed and rotary-wind aircraft, in accordance with international regulatory norms (EASA Part 66 - Licence category C).
Based on their general education in the aeronautical field, they provide technical support in the following functional modules: Assistant to Technical Data Manager, Assistant to Technical Publication Manager, Assistant to Service Engineering Manager, Technical Publication Department, Spare Parts and Logistics Department, Service Engineering Department, Maintenance Engineering Assistant.

COMPETENCIES:.
These engineers apply specific competences in the aerospace maintenance sector as specified by EASA Part 66 norms. They:
- identify and apply the technical requirements and administrative procedures for ensuring the continuing airworthiness of aircraft;
- apply aeronautical systems theory, operating standards, avionic technologies, reliability and safety (Quality Control, Reliability, Failure Rate, Safety, Risk Assessment and Component Quality);
- analyse reliability and safety requirements at system level (Failure Criticality, effects of failure at multiple-function level levels of failure tolerance according to function criticality, Failure Detection Isolation & Recovery processes);
- apply systemic criteria for reliability, maintainability and safety (Failure Probability, Mean Time Between Failures, criteria for defining spare parts, intervention times, logistics, design criteria oriented to maintainability).
Moreover
- use laboratory instrumentation;
- use written and spoken English;
- are able to work in groups and consider proposals from other experts;
- has a positive attitute toward practical activities;
- is familiar with technical documentation
- communicate work results orally and graphically in a professional manner (presentations, technical reports).


EMPLOYEMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

- Agencies and contractors responsible for aircraft maintenance;
- Airline companies;
- Aeronautical companies in general and customers' support in particular.  
Designer
Differently as the aircraft maintenance engineer, prevalently oriented to the sector of services in aeronautics, the designer workss in a more classical context and is product oriented 
FUNCTIONS IN A WORKING ENVIRONMENT:
The aerospace designer engineer identifies and analyses the requisites posed by the customers and develops design solutions. He/she finalizes the requisites for components and their interfaces and validates the technical solutions. He/she ensures the fulfilment of the requisites according to his specific domain of competence.
In spite of his/her mainly developing assisted design activities through CAx (or any other software for subsystems and components) according to guidelines established at a higher level, he/she is an engineer conceived to develop during the job experience and increasing degree of autonomy.


COMPETENCIES:

The designer is required to be able to assembly basic and technical knowledge to approach the ddesign and the development of components by correctly posing the problems, by suggesting the best approach methods and by critically discussing the possible solutions. Accordingly he should:
- be able to make hand drawings and and drafting of parts, structural and thermal evaluations related to problems of mechanics, thermodynamics, aerodynamics and aerospace plants;
- be able to use operating systems and computing codes, use of CAx systems;
- display a clear attitude to innovation and maintaining professional competence through life-long learning.
- be able to work in a team environment
- use currently written and spoken English;
- communicate work results orally and graphically in a professional manner (presentations, technical reports).

EMPLOYEMENT OPPORTUNITIES:
- Major aerospace industries of both national and European dimensions;
- Small and medium-size industries which often supply the former ones;
- The air force and other military aviation sectors;
- Industries and companies active also outside the aerospace sector.
 


Qualifications for further studies Knowledge required to continue studies
Higher Education inside MSc programmes, in particular Aerospace Engineering  Solid theoretical knowledge, albeit oriented to the engineering practice, of mathematics, physics, aerodynamics, mechanics, etc. Excellent language skills and ability to formulate problems in mathematical terms. Capacity for analysis and synthesis, communication skills. Open-mindedness and mental agility, ability to transmit knowledge, critical attitude..
 

 Expected learning outcomes

The BSc degree programme in Aerospace Engineering aims to form a professional figure who, though historically part of the industrial engineering sector, is today open to wider fields and especially all the disciplines that contribute to the design, production and management of aerospace products. Modern aerospace engineering is to all effects a type of system engineering, and increasingly has to integrate all the elements that come together in th... More...

The BSc degree programme in Aerospace Engineering aims to form a professional figure who, though historically part of the industrial engineering sector, is today open to wider fields and especially all the disciplines that contribute to the design, production and management of aerospace products. Modern aerospace engineering is to all effects a type of system engineering, and increasingly has to integrate all the elements that come together in the design or management of an aircraft or spacecraft. The knowledge base of the aerospace engineer is not specialised, even though it integrates many and varied kinds of expertise. The final goal of creating an aeronautic or space product, far from narrowing the scope of training required, expands it; even when engaged in a specialist context, aerospace engineers must be able to form a global picture of the various aspects of a problem, to assemble knowledge from disciplinary domains that are often far apart, and apply it in the general context in which the product is designed, built and used.
To achieve this, the BSc programme in Aerospace Engineering builds on a broad interdisciplinary base that sometimes digresses from the narrow industrial engineering field (including for example electronics, whose role in aerospace is now indisputable), engaging a variety of disciplines that include both those typical of the aviation industry (and to a lesser extent the space industry, which is covered more thoroughly during the MSc programme) and those that enable a systems engineer to establish a dialogue with experts in contiguous areas. This is achieved through a first study year (common to all engineering programmes of Politecnico) which includes the basic disciplines, followed by a second year (common to alll programmes of the "Class L-9", namely Industrial Engineering"). Finally, the third year is focussed on aerospace engineering.
This third year offers the students the choice between a path aiming at the continuation of studies inside the MSc programmes and a path which, without precluding study continuation, allows to go directly into employment. The first path, called Generalist, has strong theoretical and methodological contents. As to the second one the field of aircraft maintenance has been identified as particularly accessible to the BSc-level aerospace engineer and therefore the specific set of options has been named EASA Part66, being certified by ENAC on the basis of the EASA Part66 norm. More generally the training produces a professional who is aware of all aspects, not only technical, involved in aerospace activities and therefore applicable in wider contexts. Even without the in-depth knowledge provided in the MSc courses, Bachelor-level aerospace engineers have all the cognitive tools needed to continuously update their knowledge, to participate actively in the process of technological innovation, or to continue their studies if they so decide.
Graduates will then possess the knowledge requested to occupy professional roles in different environments, also by concurring to activities like design, manufacturing, management and organization, technical assistance for commercial support, risk analysis, both as professionals and inside companies, industries and public administrations.



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